What will health nuts eat on Super Bowl Sunday? Nuts!

Super Bowl Sunday is generally a write-off day for most diets, as football fans commonly indulge in everything from a few brews to something called a Bacon Explosion.

Given the public discourse on Super Bowl snacks, we at Survata decided the event presented a good opportunity to gauge how people perceive some of the most popular snack food brands. We came up with a list of 39 food items, including popular brands of chips, crackers, cookies, snack bars, and fruit snacks. We showed over 1300 respondents five randomly chosen snacks from our list, and asked them to to rank the snacks in order from what they perceived to be the most healthy to the least healthy (we avoided the debate of what “healthy” actually means; respondents’ definition of “healthy” may of course vary).

We calculated an average ranking for each snack by assigning a numerical value based on each placement it received (1 for healthiest, 2 for second healthiest, etc.). Based on that total, Kashi Go Lean Bars had the highest overall rank, with an average score of just under 2. Planter’s Nuts and Nature Valley Granola Bars were a close second and third respectively. We found that Oreo was the least healthy snack (the snack with the lowest average ranking), followed by Cheetos and Little Debbie snacks. See what consumers chose as the healthiest and least healthy below, and check out the full results here.

Survata_Snacks

There are obviously a number of ways to cut the data, including the percentage of times each snack was ranked healthiest or least healthy, but we found the results to be mostly consistent across all major metrics.

Our Take

While the highest and lowest ranked snacks came as no surprise, some puzzling results were found toward the middle of the list. Popchips, which has an ad campaign posturing the snack as a healthy alternative to potato chips, did not seem to resonate with the public, as the brand was nowhere near the highest ranked option. On the contrary, Welch’s Fruit Snacks ranked surprisingly high, beating out other snacks with relatively healthy reputations like Quaker Chewy Bars and Chex Mix. While we hope this report offered some interesting brand insight, we should add that we personally do not condone bringing health food to a Super Bowl party.

Is your brand sending the right messages? Try Survata and find out.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 1,319 online respondents from January 28 to January 30, 2014.
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing here.
  • Erin Romig

    Health food should not be brought to a Super Bowl party. Unless it’s in the form of a snack stadium (complete with Coors Light blimp)! pic.twitter.com/rcqCw7bajN