Announcing Our New Charts

At Survata we are constantly working to improve our product offerings, through new partners, enhancing current features and building new features to better adapt to industry trends and our clients’ needs. We are excited to announce our most recent enhancement of our current reporting, redesigned charts.

New and old chart

The next time you log into your survey dashboard or run a new study you will see our brand new charts which have been redesigned to look more modern and are packed with new functionality. You will now be able to do more than you have before.

Take an analytical approach to your free response data
View your free response results in a bar chart to better understand how your respondents answered your question. We display the 20 most frequently used words in your results to help you gain a better understanding of the sentiment of your respondents.

Wordcloud data
To use this yourself, from the options menu on a free response question, select “View as bar chart”.

Customize your view
There are a number of reasons you may like to see your data as a horizontal bar chart, they are often easier to read, they allow you to view more answer options for the same question and are better for displaying long labels.

flip axis
To view your own data in this way, click the options menu and select “Flip axis”.


View your charts in full-screen

At times you may want to take advantage of your screen width to get a better look at your chart. This is why we added an option for you to be able to view your chart at full-screen width. Full-screen width is particularly helpful when you have a more than 6 answer options or are viewing chart comparisons.

fullwidth chart
To use this feature select “Toggle full width” from the option menu.

These are just a few of the things you’ll notice as you navigate your new dashboard with constant improvements to come. We would love to hear your thought, feel free to reach us at product@survata.com to provide your feedback or additional request.

Our Newest Partner: Lotame

Survata and Lotame

Survata is proud to announce our newest partnership with the leading independent data management platform (DMP), Lotame. This offers clients a seamless way to conduct custom research and activate against exact audiences.

“Appending behavioral and attitudinal data, in real-time, to self-reported data for instant insights into consumers’ engagements with a brand is the future of market research,” said Jennifer Hirt-Marchand, Partner of Research at midwest advertising agency Marcus Thomas. “Technological advancements are causing changes in consumer behavior, which is radically changing the way we collect and mine for audience insights. You used to have to choose between quality, speed and cost. With this partnership, we can conduct research faster with a common metric that brands understand to help them be more agile, more efficient — smarter.”

Survata can interview consumers who are in an advertiser’s segments, which lets marketers validate that third-party segments reflect what they intended to purchase. Survata’s publisher network has the requisite scale and Lotame has more than eight billion data points in these segments to enable this validation, creating a universal metric for the industry.

This server-to-server integration also allows for the seamless and objective tracking and measurement of survey responses, which can then be combined with other first-, second- and third-party data segments via the Lotame DMP. Marketers, agencies and publishers will be able to conduct segment validation and audience profiling as well as custom segment creation. Behavioral data can also be made available on survey respondents.

While most ad effectiveness campaigns must be set up prior to the launch, this partnership will enable users to measure for ad effectiveness at any time during a campaign, offering additional flexibility and insights into campaign performance.

“Our exclusive partnership on Segment Validation with Lotame is exciting for many reasons,” said Chris Kelly, Survata CEO. “This integration creates an industry standard for validating segments, so advertisers truly reach the audience they want to reach. Beyond that, brands, agencies and media companies can now easily access Survata’s other applications, such as ad effectiveness, via Lotame. We’re thrilled to enable marketers to save time and expand their capabilities with Lotame’s help.”

Using research to demonstrate they have the target audiences an advertiser wants, publishers will be able to respond confidently to requests for proposals (RFPs) and charge premium for their highly qualified inventory. Agencies will be able to target brands’ key audiences even more effectively by offering seamless, planning, execution, and measurement, removing the need for offline to online translation normally required when targeting consumers based on attitudes.

“Lotame is dedicated to empowering our clients to effectively complete as much of their advertising execution as possible within our single platform,” said Laura Lewellyn, Senior Director of Market Innovation at Lotame. “By partnering with Survata to launch a new ratings currency, we’re leading the charge for substantiated research segments. Clients can easily add more first-party research data to their data library and put it to action for their marketing plans, in essence extending DMP functionality to become a research and planning tool.”

Online Ad Effectiveness Research Grows Up

“The days of giving digital a pass are over. It’s time to grow up.”
            -Marc Pritchard, Chief Branding Officer, Procter & Gamble, January 2017

When the CBO of P&G tells us to grow up, we listen. And after speaking with clients at last month’s Media Insights Conference, it’s clear that there’s consensus: online advertising research needs to get more sophisticated.

We’re here to help. IAB breaks research down into phases: design, recruitment & deployment, and optimization. We’ll walk through each phase and determine what’s most in need of “growing up.” We’ll also include questions to ask your research partner to help increase the sophistication of your ad effectiveness research.

Design

Let’s start by acknowledging that statistically sound online ad effectiveness research has not been easy to implement at reasonable cost until recently. As IAB notes, “Questions around recruitment, sample bias and deployment are hampering the validity of this research and undermining the industry as a whole.”

Just because perfect research design is challenging to achieve doesn’t mean that advertisers should settle for studies with debilitating flaws, leading to biased, unreliable results. In addition to challenges inherent to good research design, most ad effectiveness research partners have systematic biases due to the way they find respondents, which must be accounted for in the design phase. There has been innovation in this space within the past year using technology to reduce or eliminate systematic bias in respondent recruitment. 

Assuming you’re able to address the systematic bias of your research partner’s sampling, the major remaining challenge is how you approach the control group. At Survata, we think about this as a hierarchy:

Online Ad Effectiveness Research Control Group Framework

Using a holdout group is best practice, but implementing it requires spending some portion of your ad budget strictly on the control group. In other words, some of your ad budget will be spent on intentionally NOT showing people an ad. A small portion of people in the ad buy will instead be shown public service announcements to establish the control group. We love the purity of this approach, but we also understand the reality of advertising budgets. We don’t view holdout as a requirement for sound online ad effectiveness research. Smart design combined with technology can achieve methodologically sound control groups without “wasting” ad budget.

Along those lines, the Audience Segment approach has become de facto best practice for many of our clients. Basically, you create your control group from the same audience segment that you’re targeting in the ad buy. This isn’t perfect, as there could be an underlying reason that some people in the segment saw the ad but others didn’t (e.g., some people very rarely go online, or to very few websites), but it’s still an excellent approach. It’s the grown-up version of Demographic Matching.

Demographic Matching, in which the control group is created by matching as many demographic variables as possible with the exposed group (e.g., gender, age, income), is still a very common strategy. It’s straightforward to accomplish even using old online research methodologies. As online data has allowed us to learn far more useful information about consumers than demographic traits, this approach is dated.

Simply sampling GenPop as a control is undesirable. The results are much more likely to reveal the differences between the exposed and control groups than the effectiveness of the advertising.

Questions for your research partner

  • What are known biases among respondents due to recruitment strategy?
  • What is your total reach? What percentage of the target group is within your reach? Is it necessary to weight low-IR population respondents due to lack of scale?
  • What’s your approach to creating control groups for online ad effectiveness research?
  • For Demographic Matching, how do you determine which demographic characteristics are most important to match?
  • How do you accomplish Audience Segment matching?

Recruitment/ Deployment
 
Historically, there were four methods to recruit respondents / deploy the survey: panels, intercepts, in-banner, or email list. To stomach these methodologies, researchers had to ignore one of the following flaws: non-response bias, misrepresentation, interruption of the customer experience or email list atrophy. In our view, these methodologies are now dated since the advent of the publisher network methodology.

The publisher network works by offering consumers content, ad-free browsing, or other benefits (e.g. free Wi-Fi) in exchange for taking a survey. The survey is completed as an alternative to paying for the content or service after the consumer organically visits the publisher. In addition to avoiding the flaws of the old methodologies, the publisher network model provides dramatically increased accuracy, scale, and speed.

Questions for your research partner

  • What incentives are offered in exchange for respondent participation?
  • What are the attitudinal, behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to be in a panel versus someone not interested in being in a panel?
  • What are the attitudinal, behavioral, and demographic differences between someone willing to take a site intercept survey versus someone not interested in taking a site intercept survey?
  • How much does non-response bias affect the data?
  • Are you integrated with the client’s DMP?
  • How long to get the survey into the field, and how long until completed?
  • How does the vendor ensure that exposure bias doesn’t occur?
  • How does the vendor account for straight-liners, speeders, and other typical data quality issues?

Optimization
 
An optimal ad effectiveness campaign returns results quickly, so that immediate and continuous adjustments can be made to replace poorly performing creative, targeting, and placements with higher performing ones. We call this real-time spend allocation. It’s analogous to real-time click-through rate optimization, as it relies on solutions to the same math problem (known as the multi-armed bandit).

By integrating with DMPs, ad effectiveness research can be cross-tabbed against even more datasets. The results will yield additional insights about a company’s existing customers.

Questions for your research partner

  • Are results reported real-time?
  • How much advertising budget is wasted due to non-optimization?
  • How can DMP data be incorporated to improve ad research?

Conclusion

Flawed research methodologies can’t grow up, they can only continue to lower prices for increasingly suspect data. For online ad effectiveness research to grow up, new methodologies must be adopted.

Are Snapchat and Instagram Regional Apps? Surprising Stats Reveal the App Each Coast Prefers

From goofy distortive filters to controlled amounts of time people can view photos, Snapchat offers users an outlet for quick and raw photo sharing. Instagram, on the other hand, focuses on perfected images, allowing users to set their desired saturation points, highlights, and sharpness. Additionally, Instagram’s shifted focus to ad-based material creates additional barriers compared to Snapchat’s selective and avoidable ad-capabilities. Survata interviewed users of both apps and asked them to choose which they would keep if they could only continue using one. Overall, 57% of respondents chose Instagram, but when split up by demographic, some results are surprising.

Overall Snap vs. Insta Breakdown

Given millennials’ ever-growing technology usage, assumptions would lead to the conclusion that younger people would move toward Snapchat. However, it looks like older generations feel more dedicated to Snapchat than millennials; 52% of users ages 45-65 say they would rather keep Snapchat if given the choice.

Perhaps millennials are slowing down and beginning to like the ease of peacefully scrolling through their respective feeds. The added memories feature on Snapchat could make it more appealing to older generations, who may prefer to avoid expending energy keeping up with the Facetuned and edited perfection of America’s youth in posts.

Age Preferences

While the overall majority chose Instagram as the frontrunner, the regional breakdown of Snapchat vs. Instagram preference displays an East vs. West disparity. With Snapchat’s hub in LA, and the tech industry centered in Silicon Valley, we were not surprised that the West showed more interest in pursuing this newer app.

Regional Preferences

Interested in measuring your own consumer preferences? Try a Survata survey now and start seeing data today.

Methodology Details
This survey was commissioned by Survata and conducted by Survata, an independent research firm in San Francisco. Survata interviewed 600 online respondents between July 07, 2016 and July 18, 2016. Respondents were reached across the Survata publisher network, where they take a survey to unlock premium content, like articles and ebooks. Respondents received no cash compensation for their participation. More information on Survata’s methodology can be found at survata.com/methodology.

Millennial Intent to Cut Cable Doubles

The young continue to cut the cord on cable. By our measurements, 27% of Americans age 18 to 34 don’t pay for cable or satellite TV service, and another 8% intend to join them in the next six months. That’s an accelerating rate, as you can see in the chart below.

survata tracks Airbnb usage

Of those intending to cancel cable/satellite TV, 55% cite the high cost as the reason. What are cord cutters watching? Here are their subscription numbers: Netflix (54%), Amazon Prime (24%), Hulu (19%), and HBO Now (5%).

You can see full results here.

How Many Travelers Consider Using Airbnb?

According to investors, Airbnb is worth $25.5 billion. What? Marriott just agreed to purchase Starwood for half that amount. This seems crazy. Here at Survata, we conduct consumer research. We don’t have a stake in Airbnb’s success, we were just curious: How many people even consider Airbnb when they book travel accommodation? Turns out it’s a small number, but it’s growing fast.1

survata tracks Airbnb usage

Most people who consider Airbnb for personal travel are young: two thirds are age 18 to 34. Hardly any business travelers consider Airbnb when booking business travel. Of the 2,015 respondents across both periods of the survey, only 30 reported considering Airbnb for business travel (1.5%).

55% of Airbnb’s US revenue comes from just 5 markets that hold 30% of active units (New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami, & Boston). Our data shows a similar over-representation of those five cities for personal travelers: they make up 15% of our respondents but 29% of Airbnb customers. There’s likely a local network effect going on – people hear about their friends hosting on Airbnb, then decide to consider it when they leave town.

You can see full results of our Airbnb tracking survey here.

Footnote
1) One statistical qualifier: the margin of error on personal travelers is 3.2%. Perhaps December was a little low, and March was a little high, and in June this trend won’t seem so alarming!

When Will Americans Give Up Car Ownership?

Based on their most recent investment round, Uber is worth more than Ford. GM just invested $500 million in Lyft. Google’s self-driving car recently crashed into a bus, and in a few years there will be millions of self-driving cars crashing into buses globally.

It got us thinking here at Survata… does anyone even drive anymore? So we’ve been asking consumers about cars. It turns out the vast majority of Americans still own a car, but we’ve found an interesting group: the 45% of American car owners who would be willing to give up car ownership. The implications of this are huge. What could cause it? It differs a bit by age, as you can see in the chart below.

survata tracks ridesharing and self-driving car consumer perceptions

How weird is it that self-driving cars are ahead of ride sharing as a reason to give up car ownership? When people want to be driven around… most prefer that a robot do the driving. Frankly it’s a sensible risk assessment, and anything sensible on this topic is a relief after how many people have lost their minds over Uber.

We expect consumer perception to be an important influence on the politicians and bureaucrats who will decide who self-driving cars should be programmed to kill. We’ll keep our finger on the pulse.

Forbes and Wired Change Consumer Perceptions of Ad Blocking

Forbes and Wired recently tried an experiment. They asked website visitors using ad blocking software to turn it off – and denied them access if they refused. This was a risky move for a few reasons.

1) The media coverage of this experiment could increase awareness and usage of ad blocking software (our data does show an uptick in consumer awareness)
2) They could accidentally serve malware ads to consumers after demanding ad blocking software be turned off (Forbes has been accused of this)
3) They could lose readers (while ad blocking readers don’t generate ad revenue, they contribute to total page views which still matters to some advertisers)

We asked consumers about ad blocking in November last year, and again last month. Ad blocking software usage has stayed steady at about 9% of total American internet users.1 But our data2 shows that Forbes and Wired have likely helped move the needle on an important metric: intent to start using ad blocking software.

survata tracks Netflix's most watched originals

To sum up, though awareness may have ticked up, intent to use dropped significantly. That’s a win for online publishers. Was this a blip or a turning point? Check back with us in May to find out (or add your email address in the box on the right and we’ll send you the next batch of results).

Footnotes:
1. A recent estimate put the US percentage of ad blockers at 15%, though critics have pointed out that the publisher of the data has a vested interest in that number being as high as possible.
2. Chart displays rounded values. The change in “I haven’t used it, but I think I’m going to try it out” is outside the margin of error, i.e., is statistically significant.

Which Tech CEO Would Make the Best President?

With under 18 months remaining until the election, 2016 presidential hopefuls are announcing their bids. At the same time, the spotlight on the CEOs of technology companies has never been brighter. We decided to ask America which technology CEO they believe would make the best president. We surveyed 1503 voting age Americans, asking them to select the CEO they would be most likely to vote for in a presidential election. Their choices were Tesla CEO Elon Musk, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and Google CEO Larry Page.*

Here’s what we found:

Survata asks America to choose the best presidential candidate of tech CEOs

To see the full results, head to the Survata Public Dashboard.

* NOTE: We did not consider eligibility requirements for the US presidency, such as country of birth, in this survey. Read more about the rest of our methodology.

Join the discussion on Hacker News.

Airbnb logo redesign: More people see hearts than naughty parts

Airbnb recently launched a massive site redesign, complete with a brand new listings page and company logo. The new logo immediately caused media uproar, as many thought the Bélo depicts something more scandalous than a “symbol of belonging” as explained by Airbnb. Online discussion was less about whether the logo has human anatomical associations, and more about narrowing in on the specific private part the logo depicts. Survata has helped many designers and company executives evaluate their logos (since sometimes your logo may inadvertently look like underwear). So, we were inclined to immediately collect data on the topic, and find out whether the public at large was able to keep their minds out of the gutter.

The day of Airbnb’s redesign unveiling, we displayed their logo to several hundred online respondents and asked a simple question:

Screen Shot 2014-07-17 at 3.21.00 PM

The data indicates that innocence is perhaps not entirely lost. While responses like “boobs,” “vagina,” and “butt” came in relatively high numbers, “paperclip” and “upside-down heart” were by far the more common answers. One takeaway from this study is one we already knew: Internet commentators can shade hypercritical (or at least enjoy perpetuating a joke that might not be as apparent to a neutral party). But another is that performing quick consumer research on a logo can be a timely way to clue you in on logo issues before they are trending on Twitter.

Here’s a visualization of how people answered the above question, and you can download the underlying data here.

Screen Shot 2014-07-17 at 3.19.33 PM