Survata Ad Study Shows Platform Weakness with Young Consumers

As covered by MediaPost and Marketing Dive, Survata recently released a study showing which ad platforms rank highly for trust, relevancy, buying, and discovery by consumers.

Digital advertising is one of the hottest markets across any vertical in the world, and is one of – if not the – best ways that brands large and small connect with consumers. However, at the same time, 2017 has proven that the market also is undergoing significant volatility in the news. From Facebook to YouTube to Google to Twitter, hardly any has been immune, and the others have faced questions about their advertising potential.

Market and Ad Research firm Survata wanted to know where and how consumers put their trust and faith in the major ad platforms. So, Survata had 1,000 consumers – broken out equally among age groups – evaluate the top ad platforms Facebook, Google, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and Pinterest against each other in arguably the most important measure of “trust” along with four other key advertising categories. The categories included:

    1. Trust: Which platform are consumers most likely to trust?

    2. Experience: Which platform provides the most natural ad experience?

    3. Relevance: Which platform presents the most relevant ads?

    4. Commerce: Which platform are consumers most likely to buy something through an ad?

    5. Discovery: Which platform’s ads help them discover businesses that they wouldn’t otherwise?

Google and Facebook assuredly flexed their muscles in each category, but the study found that the youngest adult buyers gave significantly less favor to both – especially Facebook. Trust was not the social behemoths strong point. Google bested Facebook for most trusted overall by a reasonable margin, but data from the youngest group (18-24) showed that Facebook dropped precipitously in “trust” to its lowest ranking in any category or age group at fourth.

In fact, in every category, the youngest group was around half as likely to select Facebook compared to all other age groups. The drop off even seemed isolated to the this up-and-coming demographic, as it was the only age group that was dramatically different for Facebook compared to the other groups. The next-youngest age group (25-34) generally fell in line with the overall rankings, which signals that Generation Z not only presents a challenge for the duopoly, but also an opportunity for others.

THE FINDINGS
Ages 18-24 vs. Ages 25 and up

TRUST

BEST AD EXPERIENCE

MOST RELEVANT ADS

COMMERCE

DISCOVERY

The full findings were not all bad omens for Facebook and Google, though. Generally, the platforms that usually picked up the slack among the youngest demographic were Instagram and YouTube, subsidiaries of the formers respectively.

Other Insightful Findings:

    1. While relatively new to the ad game, Snapchat saw its best performance among the youngest age group. Its best-performing category by a wide margin was among 18-24-year-olds who named it as the most natural ad experience (14 percent).
    2. As previously noted, the 25-34 age group slightly favored Facebook. Facebook won every single category (even those that Google performed better), except for experience which went to Google.
    4. Instagram’s favor dropped precipitously after age 44.
    5. While it was expected that discovery and commerce were to be most closely linked, and the same for relevancy and trust, it was exactly opposite. The platform most likely to promote buying was surprisingly aligned with most likely to be trusted, and the converse was true for discovering new businesses and relevancy. Best ad experience was the outlier, as it was also the most competitive overall.

To learn more about Survata’s Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

How Survata Clients are Shaping Markets

You read them in your daily life. You react to them to define your strategies. You use them to make your business case to customers in almost every marketing and sales effort. And, you may not even know that Survata was powering them.

Statistics powered by surveys are shaping and mapping business for every single market – whether it’s consumer or B2B. Survata is a leader in survey-powered thought-leadership, and many of our clients are driving the narratives.

We want to be your partner to help you seize the conversation. See how Survata clients have made waves in June in their respective industries.

*Public Relations: “Influencers Make Difference in Cause Marketing Campaigns” — O’Dwyer’s PR
Key Stat: 35 percent of adults engage with a cause because of an influencer

*Small Biz: “40 percent of small businesses have had cash flow issues within last year” — Small Business Trends

*E-Commerce: “Online Shoppers Deserve Better Than a Duopoly” — Bloomberg Opinion
Key Stat: 55 percent of online shoppers start on Amazon

*Personal Finance: “How Many Americans Are Living Paycheck to Paycheck” — CNBC
Key Stat: 49 percent of Americans are living by each paycheck

Start your own industry-defining study today by clicking here.

Are Snapchat and Instagram Regional Apps? Surprising Stats Reveal the App Each Coast Prefers

From goofy distortive filters to controlled amounts of time people can view photos, Snapchat offers users an outlet for quick and raw photo sharing. Instagram, on the other hand, focuses on perfected images, allowing users to set their desired saturation points, highlights, and sharpness. Additionally, Instagram’s shifted focus to ad-based material creates additional barriers compared to Snapchat’s selective and avoidable ad-capabilities. Survata interviewed users of both apps and asked them to choose which they would keep if they could only continue using one. Overall, 57% of respondents chose Instagram, but when split up by demographic, some results are surprising.

Overall Snap vs. Insta Breakdown

Given millennials’ ever-growing technology usage, assumptions would lead to the conclusion that younger people would move toward Snapchat. However, it looks like older generations feel more dedicated to Snapchat than millennials; 52% of users ages 45-65 say they would rather keep Snapchat if given the choice.

Perhaps millennials are slowing down and beginning to like the ease of peacefully scrolling through their respective feeds. The added memories feature on Snapchat could make it more appealing to older generations, who may prefer to avoid expending energy keeping up with the Facetuned and edited perfection of America’s youth in posts.

Age Preferences

While the overall majority chose Instagram as the frontrunner, the regional breakdown of Snapchat vs. Instagram preference displays an East vs. West disparity. With Snapchat’s hub in LA, and the tech industry centered in Silicon Valley, we were not surprised that the West showed more interest in pursuing this newer app.

Regional Preferences

Interested in measuring your own consumer preferences? Try a Survata survey now and start seeing data today.

Methodology Details
This survey was commissioned by Survata and conducted by Survata, an independent research firm in San Francisco. Survata interviewed 600 online respondents between July 07, 2016 and July 18, 2016. Respondents were reached across the Survata publisher network, where they take a survey to unlock premium content, like articles and ebooks. Respondents received no cash compensation for their participation. More information on Survata’s methodology can be found at survata.com/methodology.

Which Tech CEO Would Make the Best President?

With under 18 months remaining until the election, 2016 presidential hopefuls are announcing their bids. At the same time, the spotlight on the CEOs of technology companies has never been brighter. We decided to ask America which technology CEO they believe would make the best president. We surveyed 1503 voting age Americans, asking them to select the CEO they would be most likely to vote for in a presidential election. Their choices were Tesla CEO Elon Musk, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and Google CEO Larry Page.*

Here’s what we found:

Survata asks America to choose the best presidential candidate of tech CEOs

To see the full results, head to the Survata Public Dashboard.

* NOTE: We did not consider eligibility requirements for the US presidency, such as country of birth, in this survey. Read more about the rest of our methodology.

Join the discussion on Hacker News.

What will health nuts eat on Super Bowl Sunday? Nuts!

Super Bowl Sunday is generally a write-off day for most diets, as football fans commonly indulge in everything from a few brews to something called a Bacon Explosion.

Given the public discourse on Super Bowl snacks, we at Survata decided the event presented a good opportunity to gauge how people perceive some of the most popular snack food brands. We came up with a list of 39 food items, including popular brands of chips, crackers, cookies, snack bars, and fruit snacks. We showed over 1300 respondents five randomly chosen snacks from our list, and asked them to to rank the snacks in order from what they perceived to be the most healthy to the least healthy (we avoided the debate of what “healthy” actually means; respondents’ definition of “healthy” may of course vary).

We calculated an average ranking for each snack by assigning a numerical value based on each placement it received (1 for healthiest, 2 for second healthiest, etc.). Based on that total, Kashi Go Lean Bars had the highest overall rank, with an average score of just under 2. Planter’s Nuts and Nature Valley Granola Bars were a close second and third respectively. We found that Oreo was the least healthy snack (the snack with the lowest average ranking), followed by Cheetos and Little Debbie snacks. See what consumers chose as the healthiest and least healthy below, and check out the full results here.

Survata_Snacks

There are obviously a number of ways to cut the data, including the percentage of times each snack was ranked healthiest or least healthy, but we found the results to be mostly consistent across all major metrics.

Our Take

While the highest and lowest ranked snacks came as no surprise, some puzzling results were found toward the middle of the list. Popchips, which has an ad campaign posturing the snack as a healthy alternative to potato chips, did not seem to resonate with the public, as the brand was nowhere near the highest ranked option. On the contrary, Welch’s Fruit Snacks ranked surprisingly high, beating out other snacks with relatively healthy reputations like Quaker Chewy Bars and Chex Mix. While we hope this report offered some interesting brand insight, we should add that we personally do not condone bringing health food to a Super Bowl party.

Is your brand sending the right messages? Try Survata and find out.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 1,319 online respondents from January 28 to January 30, 2014.
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing here.

Tech Trust Index shows consumers trust Google and Amazon but not Sprint and AOL

It’s no secret that tech companies amass vast stores of user information, from tax records to snapshots of pumpkin spice lattes. What’s more ambiguous is how this personal information is used. And while major Internet companies like Google, Yahoo, Apple, Facebook, and Microsoft publish transparency reports to distance themselves from NSA spying paranoia, companies like AT&T and Verizon are decidedly more opaque.

Given the public discourse on information gathering and transparency, we at Survata were curious to see which tech companies have garnered trust among consumers. To do so, we used our consumer survey tool to ask 3,175 online respondents to rank a group of companies in order from their most to least trusted.

In tech we trust

To rank the companies, we showed respondents five companies randomly drawn from our list of 20, and asked them to rank the companies from “most trusted” to “least trusted” with personal data. We found that, at 47%, Google was ranked as the most trusted company most often, followed by Amazon and Apple at 43% and 38%, respectively. AOL, Sprint, and Snapchat were ranked as the most trusted company least often.

There are of course other ways to cut this data. When ranking the companies by highest average placement, Amazon, Google, and Apple again earned the top three spots. Snapchat, Intuit, and AOL had the lowest average placement.

Snapchat is potentially an outlier in our group of 20 companies; because it doesn’t have the massive user base of a company like Apple, Google, or Yahoo, a lower percentage of respondents would have used it. Snapchat also (perhaps unfairly) has a well-documented reputation for exchanging particularly sensitive content (read: “sexting”).

Our take

We found it interesting that Google, which arguably holds the largest quantity of information on the average tech consumer, has maintained such a high level of popular trust. Further, we were surprised to see AT&T and Verizon among the top half of most trusted companies, considering they are bucking the trend of data sharing transparency. However, we expect this index (together with the technology of the companies themselves) to rapidly evolve.

Curious if consumers trust your company? Try Survata and find out.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 3,175 online respondents from December 5 to December 8, 2013.
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing here.

Global warming? 46% believe recent extreme weather an effect of climate change

Sunday marked the deadliest November tornado outbreak in Illinois history, as storms ripped through much of the state killing six and injuring many more.

The storm, notable for its huge scope and unusual seasonal timing, came soon after one of the most powerful typhoons in history devastated the Philippines, displacing an estimated 4 million people. Many refuse to believe that the two catastrophic weather events are coincidental, and instead attribute the extreme weather events to global climate change.

We at Survata were curious if the public would make a similar connection, and whether they even view global climate change as a viable concern. To find out, we used our consumer survey tool to ask 1,255 Americans if they believe Typhoon Haiyan and the recent tornadoes in Illinois are the result of global climate change. We found that 46% answered “Yes,” 25% answered “No,” while 29% are unsure.

Are humans to blame?

Our results show that 52% of respondents believe that human activity is primarily responsible for global warming, while 22% do not and 26% are not sure. Respondents who believe that climate change is caused by human activity are almost three times more likely than non-believers to think it’s the cause of recent extreme weather events. See the full breakdown below:

Cause for concern

We found that 29% of respondents are “very concerned” about global climate change, compared to just 16% who are “not at all concerned.” Unsurprisingly, we found that those who are “very concerned” are eight times more likely than their “not at all concerned” counterparts to attribute recent extreme weather events to global climate change.

Our take

It’s been shown that concern about global warming increases after catastrophic weather events, so the fact that our survey coincided with the aftermath of the Illinois tornadoes and Typhoon Haiyan represents a caveat. We also expect this month’s UN climate summit to affect public opinion, as the latest scientific findings disseminate.

Want to discover what your customer base cares about? Try Survata today.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 1,255 online respondents from November 18 to November 19, 2013.
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing.

Who believes that the NSA spied on Germans? Apparently, not Germans

The NSA is back in the news, as information surfaced that the agency has monitored German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s phone calls since 2002 (along with numerous other European officials).

For some reason, the public was surprised by this revelation, despite the peek Edward Snowden offered at the vast stores of NSA surveillance information and the fact that documented NSA spying has been going on since the Cold War. So, we at Survata were curious if trust in the U.S. Government varies by European and American respondents when it came to NSA spying allegations.

We used our consumer survey tool to ask 2,427 respondents across the U.S. and five European countries if they believe that the U.S. Government gathered information on European officials (even though the NSA has not denied the allegations). After excluding respondents who weren’t familiar with the story, we found that only 51% of European respondents believe the NSA spied on European officials, while 23% do not, and 26% are not sure. The results showed that U.S. respondents are significantly more likely to believe the NSA allegations:

Disbelief in Deutschland

Our results showed that American respondents, at 62%, are the most likely to believe that the NSA spied on European officials. Interestingly, Germany, the country currently at the epicenter of the scandal, is the least likely to believe the allegations are true (45%). See the full breakdown by country below:

E.U. outrage?

Unsurprisingly, we found that the U.S. is the least likely to be upset over the NSA spying scandal, as only 13% responded that they would be “extremely upset” if the allegations were true. France is the country most likely to be “extremely upset” over the NSA surveillance at 31%, followed closely by Italy.

Our take

We were surprised by the number of people who do not believe that the NSA gathered intelligence on European officials. While the degree to which the agency spied is still largely unknown, the charge itself has gone largely uncontested by the U.S. Government. And since there are rumors that the NSA spied on the Pope, we don’t think anyone can be considered out of bounds.

Does your research question need international reach? Try Survata today.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 2,427 online respondents from October 29 to November 1, 2013
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing.

Bay Area traffic flops in 14,000 respondent survey on public transit satisfaction

Close proximity to other humans and occasional delays are annoyances presented by any major city’s public transportation system, but San Francisco’s BART and Muni can seem especially exasperating. Considering the recent shutdown in service, we at Survata were interested in whether Bay Area residents are satisfied with their public transportation system, and how that compares with other major metro areas across the country.

So, we surveyed 13,867 people residing in some of the most populous cities in the country using our consumer survey service. We asked them “How satisfied are you with your city’s public transportation system?”

Seattle’s best

We found that respondents from Seattle where the most satisfied with their city’s public transportation, as 58% responded that they were either “extremely satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied.” Houston was the least satisfied metro area surveyed, with only 25% of respondents answering that they were satisfied with the city’s public transportation. See the full breakdown by metro area below:

Making the commute

We also asked respondents how frequently they use public transportation, and as expected, found that the results differed widely by city. 29% of people in the New York City metro area use public transportation every day, compared to just 8% of those in Los Angeles and 5% of those in Dallas.

Regular riders respond

We were curious if satisfaction would differ among frequent public transportation riders. The results showed that those using public transportation at least a few times per week were 56% more likely to be satisfied with their city’s public transportation system  than those using public transportation less often. Among frequent riders, we found that those in the San Francisco Bay Area were the least satisfied, as only 12% of respondents answered they were “extremely satisfied” with their system.

Our take

One obvious caveat is our survey coincided with the BART strike in the Bay Area, and might have reached Bay Area public transportation riders at their most frustrated. However, we figure that if public opinion of a transportation system fluctuates so significantly, it probably doesn’t bode well for its overall user satisfaction. Plus, some of us in the office have seen live chickens on Muni so we weren’t exactly blindsided by criticism of San Francisco’s public transportation.

Want to gauge consumer satisfaction for your own product? Try Survata today.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 13,867 online respondents from October 14 to October 22, 2013
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing.

Largest existing survey shows 19% support a name change for the Washington Redskins

The Washington Redskins have recently garnered criticism, most notably by sportscaster Bob Costas and President Obama, for a team name many consider to be racially offensive towards Native Americans. But a name change is certainly not on the horizon for the storied NFL program, according to the team’s owner Daniel Snyder.

Given the high-profile debate, we at Survata were curious to see how public opinion stacked up. We used our consumer survey service to ask 5,913 Americans if they thought the Washington Redskins should change their team name.

We found that 30% of respondents thought the Redskins should not change their team name, while 19% thought a new name is in order. 51% responded “I have no opinion.”

What’s in a name?

We found that opinion differed significantly by gender. 39% of male respondents believed the name should remain unchanged, compared to just 25% of female respondents.

Pigskin prejudice?

Unsurprisingly, we found that NFL fans were more than twice as likely as non-NFL fans to have an opinion on the matter. 50% of NFL fans answered that the Redskins should keep their name, compared to 23% of those not interested in NFL football.

The logo effect

We were curious to see if inclusion of the Redskins logo would affect how respondents answered. Using the original survey as a control, we found that non-NFL fans were 15% less likely to answer “I have no opinion” when faced with the team logo in an otherwise identical survey. The results were scattered, however, as non-NFL fans were more likely both to support and oppose a name change when presented with the team’s logo.

Our take

The effect of displaying the Redskins logo for survey respondents was intriguing. Whether respondents found the logo to be offensive or noble, this was a powerful demonstration of how consumer opinion can be influenced by a visual aid.

Want to test how the public perceives your brand? Try Survata today.

Footnotes for our fellow data geeks

  1. We interviewed 5,913 online respondents from October 10 to October 14, 2013
  2. You can download the underlying data here.
  3. You can analyze the underlying data in Statwing.