Survata Study Uncovers Consumer Sentiment on Smart Speaker Sponsored Content

Read our exclusive release with Business Insider.
Download our full Smart Speaker Insights Sheet here.

Survata Study Uncovers Consumer Sentiment on Smart Speaker Sponsored Content
Apple HomePod Owners are Most Interested in Sponsored Content

In a study of 2,000 U.S. consumers, Market and Advertising Research and Measurement firm Survata today released findings on consumers’ sentiment toward receiving sponsored content on smart speakers, a growing consumer-device market. While the majority of consumers aren’t enthusiastic about experiencing more advertising, Survata found some interesting trends among the different smart-speaker brand owners.

Though they represented the smallest segment of smart speaker owners, Apple HomePod users are the most likely to be interested to hear about sponsored products or services (35 percent). That stands in contrast to Google HOME owners at 22 percent and Amazon Echo/Dot users at only 17 percent. In addition, Apple HomePod owners also were the most likely to think sponsored content would very positively affect their smart-speaker experiences (22 percent), compared to only 12 percent for Google HOME owners and 7 percent for Amazon Echo/Dot owners.

As brands and advertisers look to new ways to connect with potential customers, Survata also analyzed the types of sponsored content that consumers would find most helpful. Almost half (47 percent) thought restaurant sponsored recommendations would be helpful, with special events (41 percent), groceries (39 percent) and electronic products (37 percent) rounding out the top four.

The smart speaker study also uncovered some other notable findings, including:
23 percent: Ages 35-54 were the most likely group to be interested in sponsored content.
41 percent: High-frequency smart speaker users also were most likely to have interest in sponsored content.
38 percent: A plurality of consumers use their smart speaker 2-10 times a day.
72 percent: The most common task people use their smart speaker for is to listen to music, followed by checking the weather (54 percent) and asking questions or facts (52 percent).

For a full breakdown of all of the Survata Smart Speaker Study findings, you can view the full report here.

Survata conducted its Smart Speaker study in September 2018, interviewing 2,001 consumers. For more information on Survata’s methodology, please visit www.survata.com/methodology.

Download our full Smart Speaker Insights Sheet here.

Insights Summary: Nike + Colin Kaepernick

Survata conducted a study to determine consumer sentiment towards the Nike ad featuring Colin Kaepernick the week it aired. Metrics such as brand favorability, and purchase / viewing intent were included for both Nike and the NFL.

Summary
The sample was nationally representative of the US population on age and gender. Over one-third of respondents (35%) chose not to disclose their political affiliation, likely due to the sensitive nature of the survey topic.

Almost half of all respondents have purchased Nike in the past (48%). Ad recall for the Nike ad featuring Colin Kaepernick was 42% at the overall level. Those who reported having seen the Nike ad were more likely to view Nike favorably than those who had not seen the ad (29% to 16%).

Download the full Insights Summary Sheet here to get additional data broken down by age, gender, and political idealogy.

Survata interviewed 501 online respondents between September 7th–10th, 2018. The study was sampled within the United States, and was nationally representative of the US population on age and gender. The margin of error for this study at a 95% confidence level is 4.4%.

To learn about about Survata Market Research, please contact us.

The Global Conscious Consumer with Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, CMO of Mozilla

Brand Knew is a new podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the sponsor – check out their fourth episode below with Mozilla CMO, Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.

——

Brand Knew Ep. #4: The Global Conscious Consumer with Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, CMO of Mozilla

Mozilla, the company that makes the Firefox browser, competes with Google, Apple and Microsoft. Mozilla’s never going to win a traditional marketing battle against these goliaths, so instead they focus on long-term brand-building initiatives: art installations and advocacy for an open internet.

Listen to the CMO of Mozilla, Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, discuss his approach to brand building, their discovery of the global “conscious chooser” segment, and why he thinks it’s important to teach incarcerated individuals how to code.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Survata ‘Tech Trust Index’ Finds Tech Brands Consumers Trust Most with Their Data

Amazon takes top spot by wide margin, but technology least-trusted sector

In a study of more than 2,600 consumers released exclusively with Business Insider, market and advertising research firm Survata today released its “Tech Trust Index,” a ranking of the top 15 tech brands most trusted by consumers’ with their personal data.

The Index, which asked consumers to rate many of the most well-known tech brands from one to five (one being most trusted; five being least trusted), found that Amazon was by far and away the most-trusted tech brand with an average score of 1.87. Amazon was the only company with a rating under two (2), with Paypal coming in second place with a 2.05 average rating.

The rest of the top 15 ranked as follows: Microsoft (2.13), Apple (2.26), IBM (2.41), Yahoo (2.43), Google (2.53), YouTube (2.58), eBay (2.78), Pandora (2.88), Facebook (2.90), Linkedin (2.97), Spotify (3.16), AOL (3.20) and Instagram (3.24).

Facebook, which recently has been at the center of a lot of consumer data controversy, seemed to create the most polarization among consumers, as they overwhelmingly either ranked it as most trusted (1) or least trusted (5).

In addition to identifying the top 15 most-trusted tech brands, Survata also studied consumers on a number of other questions regarding their data preferences. Those results include:

    -58 percent of consumers would not pay a tech platform a nominal fee to avoid it using their data. Only 8 percent said they would, with 34 percent unsure.

    -A surprisingly large one-third (33 percent) of consumers value the convenience technology adds to their lives more than their data privacy. However, the youngest age group (18-24) was the most likely (42 percent) to value convenience more than data privacy.

    -The consumer-technology sector was the least-trusted sector by consumers, even losing significantly to retailers, which have had their own battles with high-profile breaches. Unsurprisingly, healthcare was the most-trusted sector.

    -Nearly 70 percent of consumers think they should control when and how a public tech platform uses their data, even if they voluntarily put that data on that platform.

Survata conducted its Tech Trust Index study from April 23-26, interviewing 2,601 consumers. For more information on Survata’s methodology, please visit www.survata.com/methodology.

Leaning Towards the Customer w/ Ryan Green, Chief Marketing Officer of Southwest Airlines

Brand Knew is a new podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the sponsor – check out their third episode below with Southwest CMO, Ryan Green, and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.

—-
Brand Knew Ep. #3: Leaning Towards the Customer w/ Ryan Green, Chief Marketing Officer of Southwest Airlines

Southwest Airlines is different. They don’t charge change fees, cancellation fees, or bag fees. They don’t publish their fares on aggregator websites. They don’t even have assigned seats. They might be weird, but they’re doing something right: JD Power ranked Southwest #1 among airlines in their 2017 customer satisfaction report.

On this episode of the Brand Knew podcast, listen to Ryan Green, Chief Marketing Officer of Southwest Airlines, discuss how the company’s “maverick spirit” drives great customer service.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Survata Study Uncovers Most Memorable Brand Advertising Slogans

KFC “Finger lickin’ good” edges Kay Jewelers “Every kiss begins with Kay” for top spot

As covered by USA Today, Advertising and Market Research firm Survata today unveiled a top most memorable advertising slogans recognized by consumers. In a study of 3,286 U.S. consumers, KFC’s “Finger lickin’ good” came out on top with an 87.9 percent recognized rate, barely edging out Kay Jewelers highly successful “Every kiss begins with Kay” at 87.4 percent.

The study, which looked at 76 advertising slogans from well-known brands spanning most consumer industries, asked consumers to read a famous slogan, then supply the brand behind the slogan in a “free” response. All identifying brand references – like “Kay” in “Every kiss begins with Kay” – were removed to respect the study’s integrity.

All but one of the slogans found in the top 25 list were recognized by a majority of consumers, and the list included many classics from advertising juggernauts. However,

The Top 50 “Most Memorable Brand Advertising Slogans” are:
“Finger lickin’ good”, KFC — 87.9%
“Every kiss begins with ___”, Kay Jewelers — 87.4%

“15 minutes could save you 15% or more” Geico — 82.32%
“Just do it”, Nike — 82.31%
“Snap, Crackle, Pop”, Rice Krispies — 79.53%
“You’re in good hands”, Allstate — 78.21%
“Taste the rainbow”, Skittles — 75.14%
“Melts in your mouth, not in your hands”, M&Ms –73.19%
“Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s ____”, Maybelline — 69.28%
“I’m lovin’ it”, McDonalds — 68.91%
“____ is on your side”, Nationwide — 68.75%
“They’re G-r-r-reat!” Frosted Flakes — 68.29%
“We have the meats”, Arby’s — 67.77%
“The king of beers”, Budweiser — 66.14%
“M’m! M’m! Good!” Campbell’s — 62.05%
“It gives you wings”, Red Bull — 59.31%
“The happiest place on Earth”, Disney — 58.7%
“The breakfast of champions” Wheaties — 57.14%
“Can you hear me now?”, Verizon — 54.93%
“Taste so good, cats ask for it by name” — 53.85%
“Eat fresh”, Subway — 52.42%
“When it absolutely, positively has to be there overnight”, FedEx — 52.41%
“At the corner of happy and healthy”, Walgreens — 51.54%
“Betcha can’t eat just one”, Lays — 50.75%
“The snack that smiles back” Goldfish — 49.02%
Surprisingly, many brand slogans outside of the top 25 – and thus where a majority of consumers couldn’t identify the brand – were seemingly familiar. Some of the most familiar ones included
What’s in your wallet” — Capital One — 43.14%
“Think outside the bun” — Taco Bell — 33.86%
There are some things money can’t buy. For everything else, there’s …” Mastercard — 45.19%

See the full results below:

Most regonizable Taglines

Survata interviewed 3,286 online respondents, closely equal across age groups and genders. Respondents were reached across the Survata publisher network, where they take a survey to unlock premium content, like articles and ebooks. Respondents received no cash compensation for their participation. More information can be found at survata.com/methodology.

The Past and Future of Ride-Sharing w/ Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft

BrandKnew_Episode_2b

Brand Knew is a new bi-monthly podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the initial sponsor – check out their second episode below and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.

—-

Brand Knew Ep. #2: The Past and Future of Ride-Sharing w/ Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft

In 2017, Lyft expanded coverage in the United States from 54% of the population to 95% of the population. They also added their first international market, Canada. Along the way, the brand was updated. The pink mustaches are gone, but the friendliness is still there. Even with this growth, only 0.4% of miles driven in the US are ride-sharing miles, so there’s still plenty of open road ahead.

Self-driving cars are here. Lyft demonstrated their technology at CES this year. So what happens to the 300,000+ Lyft drivers when the cars can drive themselves?

On this episode of Brand Knew, listen to Melissa Waters, Lyft’s VP of Marketing, discuss how the brand has evolved with the changing ride-sharing market, and what’s going to become of all those those drivers.

Edited excerpts below:

Are you essentially managing two brands at Lyft? One for riders and one for drivers?

Our core brand opportunity is to ensure that we continue to take care of our drivers. What we found is that by taking care of drivers they took care of passengers. So this great flywheel happens: we take care of drivers, they take care of passengers, they provide a great experience, and then passengers say, “Wow, I loved my driver.” Technically we manage two audiences, but really we are one brand. We think about our brand in the intersection of the ride experience: two people getting into a car together.

How do you maintain a unique brand position when your competitors (i.e., Uber) start to emulate you?

I think the best way to do it is to talk about the fact that we’ve been doing it since day one. If we can build awareness of that story, that goes a long way. Our drivers know it. People who are just starting to try us on the passenger side may not know our origin point. They just think of us as “the pink one.” There’s still hurdles to make sure passengers are aware of our origin story, but that feels like a pretty defensible claim. We’ve been here since day one and we’re still operating the same way.

Based on a consumer survey I conducted, about 15% of riders would actually prefer a ride in a self-driving car. How do you manage that looming conflict, between riders who want a driverless car, and drivers who want to keep their jobs?

In a far future vehicle we believe it’s going to be a “car-like object” with multiple people in it, and you can imagine all kinds of situations in which you would need a steward inside that vehicle. You might need to load strollers, assist elderly people or somebody in a wheelchair. A certain amount of road miles will be driven by self-driving vehicles, but others will not be, such as highly dense traffic areas or outside of normal use cases. You’ll need drivers. Then very far afield when the majority of miles are self-driven, there’s still a role for people in vehicles. We think about those vehicles as potentially “the bar car,” “the nail salon on wheels,” all manner of different innovations.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Amazon Takes 49 Percent of Consumers’ First Product Search, But Search Engines Rebound

Survata Bloomberg Amazon

As covered by Bloomberg, Survata’s Amazon study data powers some of the most important stats in business and brand intel.

Amazon Takes 49 Percent of Consumers’ First Product Search, But Search Engines Rebound
2017 Survata Study Finds 84 Percent in U.S. Expect to Buy Through Amazon This Holiday Season

A new study of 2,000 U.S. consumers by ad and market research firm Survata found that Amazon is still the top spot for consumers’ first product search, yet the company lost some ground to rebounding search engines like Google. Now, 49 percent of consumers turn to Amazon first when shopping for products online, with search engines taking 36 percent and retailers falling farther back at 15 percent. In 2016, a Survata study – previously commissioned by BloomReach – found Amazon at 55 percent, search engines at 28 percent and retailers at 16 percent.

Not only did search engines do better overall this year, but they also did very well – beating Amazon – when searchers were looking to be inspired and didn’t have a specific purchase in mind. Nearly 46 percent will start on search engines when they have no idea of what they want, with Amazon trailing at 39 percent. The remainder, 15 percent of U.S. consumers, said they’d start at a preferred retailer when they weren’t sure what they wanted. Related to specific product categories, electronics, apparel and home furnishings had the highest likelihood for consumers to start on a search engine over Amazon.

The rebound for search engines to 2015 study levels as consumers’ top choice could be attributed to the growing proliferation of mobile devices and traffic, coupled with the improvements in mobile search. Mobile commerce has grown rapidly in the last few years, and online-shopping traffic via mobile this holiday season is expected to account for more than half of retail visits for the first time. Search engines like Google have prioritized mobile search, and a previous study by Google found that search was the primary and most often used mobile-shopping tool.

However, with Amazon still having the advantage on search engines overall and a stranglehold on retailers, Survata also wanted to know why Amazon had that edge. Surprisingly, the study found that price was not the most common main factor consumers started on Amazon.

    -28 percent of consumers credited Amazon’s experience and easy-to-use navigation.
    -27 percent cited Amazon’s product variety and selection as their primary reason for starting there.
    -25 percent named prices as the reason, coming in a startling third place.
    -17 percent said Amazon’s shipping capabilities gave them the edge.

Amazon’s dominance over retailers was even more bleak as it related to holiday shopping. Conducted in the heart of this year’s record-setting holiday-shopping season, Survata’s Amazon study found that 84 percent of U.S. consumers expect to buy a gift on Amazon this year, with nearly half planning to spend at least 50 percent of their holiday budgets through Amazon.

How and where consumers choose to search for products online have significant implications on brand advertising, especially as the competition for advertising dollars between Google and Amazon stays hot. Survata’s Amazon study found that Amazon’s ads were slightly more trusted than Google’s, though not overwhelmingly. Approximately 31 percent of consumers felt that Amazon’s ads were better for finding trusted brands, compared to almost 22 percent for Google. Nearly half, 47 percent, felt that neither was better. A September analysis of 1,000 U.S. consumers by Survata found that 44 percent reported clicking on at least one sponsored product ad on Amazon, versus 46 percent who hadn’t. Approximately 10 percent said they didn’t use Amazon.

ABOUT SURVATA
Survata is a fast-growing technology company that provides brand intelligence to the world’s leading brands and agencies. Clients use Survata’s platform to talk to consumers after every touchpoint, from ad impressions and site visits to purchases and offline behavior. Survata integrates with the leading Data Management Platforms to enable powerful ad research, customer research and market research. The company is headquartered in San Francisco and backed by leading Silicon Valley venture capital investors, including YCombinator, SoftTech VC, PivotNorth Capital, IDG Ventures and Bloomberg Beta. Learn more at www.survata.com

###

Survata is Proud to Sponsor the Brand Knew Podcast

Brand Knew is a new bi-monthly podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the initial sponsor – check out their first episode below and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.

—-

Brand Knew Ep. #1: Discovering Fashion Consumers with Aimee Lapic, former CMO of Banana Republic

In the past five years, online consumer attention has shifted dramatically. In 2012, consumers spent 4.3 hours a day online, with 36% of that on their mobile devices. Today it’s 5.6 hours a day, with 54% on mobile [Source: Mary Meeker Internet Trends] That requires a shift in the marketing strategies of fashion companies, as consumers discover fashion inspiration in new places.

While consumers were changing, so was the competition, with the emergence of subscription model fashion companies such as Stitch Fix and LeTote. These companies try to combat high return rates by predicting what their customers will decide to keep – an approach that may eventually be their undoing.

On this episode of the Brand Knew podcast, Aimée Lapic reveals how she responded to these challenges as CMO of Banana Republic, and provides perspective on the challenges facing the new model fashion companies. Excerpts of Aimée’s interview below:

On the Banana Republic customer:

“I found out that Banana Republic, at the time, did not know who their customer was. They thought that the customer really was looking to Banana for fashion guidance and advice and inspiration. And instead the customer had moved beyond that and was more about expressing themselves through fashion. They were very self-confident people. They did not dress for one occasion versus another – they dress to accentuate their personalities and what they were looking for in a brand such as Banana Republic is a partner in that.”

On the shift from traditional advertising to digital:

“When I inherited the role about 80% of our media was focused on what I call traditional media, print magazines out-of-home advertising, even radio. And quickly I changed that structure to be 90% focused on digital marketing and about 10% focused on still the traditional marketing because that’s where the customer was looking for fashion inspiration. For example, something like 30% of customers at Banana Republic received their inspiration from social media websites.”

On which fashion companies are winning ecommerce:

“I do think there are smaller companies that are willing to take risks in how they go to market and how they meet customer needs that seem to be winning. For example, like a Stitch Fix. According to public information they are close to a billion dollars now in sales which is a super-fast growth rate. I think what makes them win in this ecommerce space is the idea that they’ve taken the risk out of not being able to try on clothes having easy returns for different customers. They’ve put a lot of focus on the data algorithm that allows them to really understand what customers need in terms of fit and styling and types of clothes they like over time.”

On the challenges of a Stitch Fix or LeTote:

“I frankly think the biggest issue for the subscription based businesses over time is retention of customers. The reason the customers are signing up for a Le Tote or a Stitch Fix is because they want to try new things. They want new things in their closet without a lot of risk. Over time, does Stich Fix or LeTote represent new things anymore or does it become part of what their norm is? I think the reason people are attracted to them in terms of innovation may be their undoing over time unless they can continue to keep it really new and different.”

Join us for our next episode where we will be talking to Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft, about the past and future of ride-sharing.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Survata Ad Study Shows Platform Weakness with Young Consumers

As covered by MediaPost and Marketing Dive, Survata recently released a study showing which ad platforms rank highly for trust, relevancy, buying, and discovery by consumers.

Digital advertising is one of the hottest markets across any vertical in the world, and is one of – if not the – best ways that brands large and small connect with consumers. However, at the same time, 2017 has proven that the market also is undergoing significant volatility in the news. From Facebook to YouTube to Google to Twitter, hardly any has been immune, and the others have faced questions about their advertising potential.

Market and Ad Research firm Survata wanted to know where and how consumers put their trust and faith in the major ad platforms. So, Survata had 1,000 consumers – broken out equally among age groups – evaluate the top ad platforms Facebook, Google, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and Pinterest against each other in arguably the most important measure of “trust” along with four other key advertising categories. The categories included:

    1. Trust: Which platform are consumers most likely to trust?

    2. Experience: Which platform provides the most natural ad experience?

    3. Relevance: Which platform presents the most relevant ads?

    4. Commerce: Which platform are consumers most likely to buy something through an ad?

    5. Discovery: Which platform’s ads help them discover businesses that they wouldn’t otherwise?

Google and Facebook assuredly flexed their muscles in each category, but the study found that the youngest adult buyers gave significantly less favor to both – especially Facebook. Trust was not the social behemoths strong point. Google bested Facebook for most trusted overall by a reasonable margin, but data from the youngest group (18-24) showed that Facebook dropped precipitously in “trust” to its lowest ranking in any category or age group at fourth.

In fact, in every category, the youngest group was around half as likely to select Facebook compared to all other age groups. The drop off even seemed isolated to the this up-and-coming demographic, as it was the only age group that was dramatically different for Facebook compared to the other groups. The next-youngest age group (25-34) generally fell in line with the overall rankings, which signals that Generation Z not only presents a challenge for the duopoly, but also an opportunity for others.

THE FINDINGS
Ages 18-24 vs. Ages 25 and up

TRUST

BEST AD EXPERIENCE

MOST RELEVANT ADS

COMMERCE

DISCOVERY

The full findings were not all bad omens for Facebook and Google, though. Generally, the platforms that usually picked up the slack among the youngest demographic were Instagram and YouTube, subsidiaries of the formers respectively.

Other Insightful Findings:

    1. While relatively new to the ad game, Snapchat saw its best performance among the youngest age group. Its best-performing category by a wide margin was among 18-24-year-olds who named it as the most natural ad experience (14 percent).
    2. As previously noted, the 25-34 age group slightly favored Facebook. Facebook won every single category (even those that Google performed better), except for experience which went to Google.
    4. Instagram’s favor dropped precipitously after age 44.
    5. While it was expected that discovery and commerce were to be most closely linked, and the same for relevancy and trust, it was exactly opposite. The platform most likely to promote buying was surprisingly aligned with most likely to be trusted, and the converse was true for discovering new businesses and relevancy. Best ad experience was the outlier, as it was also the most competitive overall.

To learn more about Survata’s Ad Research solutions, please contact us.