25 Million Verizon/AT&T Subscribers Up for Grabs in Next Six Months

Verizon and AT&T are the dominant US wireless carriers, with over 70% of subscribers between them. T-Mobile just announced a good quarter driven by new customers, mostly poached from AT&T. We wondered, how many people are going to abandon AT&T and Verizon this year?

We asked AT&T and Verizon wireless customers – specifically those who pay the bill or whose spouse pays the bill – if they intend to switch wireless carriers in the next six months. As you can see below, the majority of people aren’t interested in switching carriers – but there’s a sizable portion of contracts up for grabs.

survata tracks AT&T and Verizon customer loyalty

Combining subscribers “somewhat likely” and “very likely” to switch equates to 14.5 million AT&T customers and 10.5 million Verizon customers up for grabs in the next six months.1

Where are subscribers likely to leave AT&T and Verizon going? 78% of switchers will stay in the top 4 (Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint), while 22% will move to smaller carriers.

Click here for full results.

1. Taking margin of error into account, at 95% confidence interval, the range of customers up for grabs is 9 to 20 million for AT&T, and 6 to 15 million for Verizon.

One Third of Midwestern Smokers Smoke at Least a Pack Per Day

According to the CDC, the percentage of American adults that smoke cigarettes is at its lowest point since they started tracking (currently about 17% of American adults smoke). That seems good. But we wanted to dive a little deeper. Are American smokers also smoking fewer cigarettes per day? It turns out, no. In November 2015 and February 2016, the distribution of smokers was nearly identical between periods. So while the percentage of American smokers may be going down, the amount of cigarettes smokers consume is steady.

We did notice differences in cigarette consumption among regions, as you can see in the chart below (which includes both the November 2015 and February 2016 periods of the survey).

survata tracks smoking

30% of smokers don’t agree that smoking is bad for your health. This group is ten times as likely to agree with the following statements about smoking: “It’s not as bad for your health as most people think” (18% vs 2% of those who agree that smoking is bad for your health) and “As long as you have the right genes, it’s not bad for your health” (12% vs 1% of those who agree that smoking is bad for your health).

Check out full results here, including the percentage of smokers who do it to reduce stress.

Millennial Intent to Cut Cable Doubles

The young continue to cut the cord on cable. By our measurements, 27% of Americans age 18 to 34 don’t pay for cable or satellite TV service, and another 8% intend to join them in the next six months. That’s an accelerating rate, as you can see in the chart below.

survata tracks Airbnb usage

Of those intending to cancel cable/satellite TV, 55% cite the high cost as the reason. What are cord cutters watching? Here are their subscription numbers: Netflix (54%), Amazon Prime (24%), Hulu (19%), and HBO Now (5%).

You can see full results here.

How Many Travelers Consider Using Airbnb?

According to investors, Airbnb is worth $25.5 billion. What? Marriott just agreed to purchase Starwood for half that amount. This seems crazy. Here at Survata, we conduct consumer research. We don’t have a stake in Airbnb’s success, we were just curious: How many people even consider Airbnb when they book travel accommodation? Turns out it’s a small number, but it’s growing fast.1

survata tracks Airbnb usage

Most people who consider Airbnb for personal travel are young: two thirds are age 18 to 34. Hardly any business travelers consider Airbnb when booking business travel. Of the 2,015 respondents across both periods of the survey, only 30 reported considering Airbnb for business travel (1.5%).

55% of Airbnb’s US revenue comes from just 5 markets that hold 30% of active units (New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami, & Boston). Our data shows a similar over-representation of those five cities for personal travelers: they make up 15% of our respondents but 29% of Airbnb customers. There’s likely a local network effect going on – people hear about their friends hosting on Airbnb, then decide to consider it when they leave town.

You can see full results of our Airbnb tracking survey here.

Footnote
1) One statistical qualifier: the margin of error on personal travelers is 3.2%. Perhaps December was a little low, and March was a little high, and in June this trend won’t seem so alarming!