Trends in Ad Measurement NYC – Panel & Happy Hour on 2/8/2018

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After our successful event in San Francisco, Survata is bringing “Trends in Ad Measurement” to NYC on Thursday, February 8th, 2018. Enjoy an evening of networking and expert insights complemented by food, drinks, and conversation.

Moderated by Chris Kuist, Sr. VP of Research and Impact at the IAB, and joined by a panel of industry leaders in Ad Research:

-Alissa Tofias – Director of Digital Marketing at HBO
-Dan Robbins – Head of Ad Research at Roku
-Erin Spira – Agency Lead, Marketing Effectiveness at Verizon
-Jonny Silberman – Director of Digital Strategy & Innovation at Anheuser-Busch InBev
-Kristina Kaganer – Director of Global Data Strategy at Coty

We will discuss ways hot topics in the industry including programmatic, brand safety, attribution, and brand lift.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2018

Registration and networking: 6:00 – 7:00 PM
Panel discussion: 7:00 – 8:00 PM
Continued networking: 8:00 – 9:00 PM

Helen Mills Gallery in Chelsea – 137 W 26th Street, NY NY 10001 (Between 6th and 7th Avenue)

Register Today >>>

We hope to see you there!

The Past and Future of Ride-Sharing w/ Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft

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Brand Knew is a new bi-monthly podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the initial sponsor – check out their second episode below and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.

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Brand Knew Ep. #2: The Past and Future of Ride-Sharing w/ Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft

In 2017, Lyft expanded coverage in the United States from 54% of the population to 95% of the population. They also added their first international market, Canada. Along the way, the brand was updated. The pink mustaches are gone, but the friendliness is still there. Even with this growth, only 0.4% of miles driven in the US are ride-sharing miles, so there’s still plenty of open road ahead.

Self-driving cars are here. Lyft demonstrated their technology at CES this year. So what happens to the 300,000+ Lyft drivers when the cars can drive themselves?

On this episode of Brand Knew, listen to Melissa Waters, Lyft’s VP of Marketing, discuss how the brand has evolved with the changing ride-sharing market, and what’s going to become of all those those drivers.

Edited excerpts below:

Are you essentially managing two brands at Lyft? One for riders and one for drivers?

Our core brand opportunity is to ensure that we continue to take care of our drivers. What we found is that by taking care of drivers they took care of passengers. So this great flywheel happens: we take care of drivers, they take care of passengers, they provide a great experience, and then passengers say, “Wow, I loved my driver.” Technically we manage two audiences, but really we are one brand. We think about our brand in the intersection of the ride experience: two people getting into a car together.

How do you maintain a unique brand position when your competitors (i.e., Uber) start to emulate you?

I think the best way to do it is to talk about the fact that we’ve been doing it since day one. If we can build awareness of that story, that goes a long way. Our drivers know it. People who are just starting to try us on the passenger side may not know our origin point. They just think of us as “the pink one.” There’s still hurdles to make sure passengers are aware of our origin story, but that feels like a pretty defensible claim. We’ve been here since day one and we’re still operating the same way.

Based on a consumer survey I conducted, about 15% of riders would actually prefer a ride in a self-driving car. How do you manage that looming conflict, between riders who want a driverless car, and drivers who want to keep their jobs?

In a far future vehicle we believe it’s going to be a “car-like object” with multiple people in it, and you can imagine all kinds of situations in which you would need a steward inside that vehicle. You might need to load strollers, assist elderly people or somebody in a wheelchair. A certain amount of road miles will be driven by self-driving vehicles, but others will not be, such as highly dense traffic areas or outside of normal use cases. You’ll need drivers. Then very far afield when the majority of miles are self-driven, there’s still a role for people in vehicles. We think about those vehicles as potentially “the bar car,” “the nail salon on wheels,” all manner of different innovations.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Inaccurate Segments May Be Costing Advertisers Billions

Survata AdExchanger
Our CEO Chris Kelly was featured as a guest writer on AdExchanger’s “Data-Driven Thinking” column, calling for more Segment Validation in Programmatic Advertising. Read the full piece below:

Inaccurate Segments May Be Costing Advertisers Billions

We’ve all read the doom-and-gloom news about programmatic problems, from YouTube’s brand safety issues to brand advertisers culling their spending and companies like Chase maintaining performance with drastically reduced ad placements. We’ve seen death prognostications of programmatic as the future of digital marketing, then even the death to the death of programmatic predictions. Dizzying.

The one good thing resulting from the discussion has been the honest reflections on how programmatic can grow up.

However, that’s where it largely stopped, and I can’t help but notice that we only addressed half of the equation. While the industry collectively groaned about the “where” within programmatic advertising – where the ads show up – we haven’t sufficiently reflected on its “who,” as in who is seeing the ads.

Do the audience segments that power programmatic contain who they’re labeled to contain?

It’s a fair question. As New York Times CEO Mark Thompson recently wondered, “When we say a member of the audience is a female fashionista aged 20 to 30, what’s the probability that that’s actually true?”

The reality is that it may be quite low. We’ve been so consumed with brand safety and fixing programmatic spray-and-pray approaches that we haven’t really thought about segment validation. Are we sure a segment of “in-market SUV buyers” contains a larger percentage of buyers than a randomized control group? How can we prove that?

Perhaps this “who” question is programmatic’s next dirty little secret. Data scientists creating segments have many economic incentives to make a segment larger, but few to make it more accurate. And they’re allowed to sell it as a black box. Under these circumstances, we can’t expect consistently accurate audiences.

So, how can we get ahead of this issue before it rises to “crisis” levels, like the brand safety scandals?

The first step is admitting there is a problem. Based on industry chatter, we’re already in the first phases. It’s time to dig in and ask tough questions.

Sanity Check, Please

Sometimes the math behind a segment just isn’t there. I’ve seen a segment that supposedly contained small US business owners that was larger than the Census Bureau’s count of small business owners, multiplied by any reasonable device-per-person ratio. Even if you ignore the impossibility of more than 100% membership rates in a category, is it possible that a model captured 70% of people in a certain category? Sanity-checking audience sizes against a Google search should be a first move, especially when millions of advertising dollars are at stake.

Understand Different Data Types

The “who” within advertising segments is generally determined by three types of data: declared, observed or inferred. Many may know that, but if you’d like a refresher, see here.

Understanding the different types is critical because programmatic segments are made up using one or more of these types. Yet brands often don’t ask their partners which is which. I’ve often seen a brand think a segment it’s getting is observed when it’s actuality inferred. That matters, especially if you don’t know the criteria that determined the inferences.

Check The Source

I’ve heard horror stories about agencies doing a forensic dive into segments to learn people who read about a car crash were put into an “automotive intenders” segment. I’m convinced these are more true than apocryphal. Brands should find out about the precise criteria for being put in certain segments. What trade-offs were made between accuracy and scale? Don’t let it be a black box.

Building audiences is hard. The challenges are significant: Offline data may be available only at the household level, family members may share devices and modeling may be unavoidable in many cases. So, the expectations shouldn’t be that a segment contains only people with a specific attribute, but that it contains significantly more people with that attribute than an untargeted group.

Even acknowledging those difficulties, I can’t help but think of the billions of dollars wasted over the years marketing to incorrectly targeted audiences. Programmatic spend is nearing $33 billion in the US alone this year. It’s hard to know precisely the media dollars powered by third-party data versus first-party data, but even conservatively admitting that 10% to 20% of third-party segments are invalid implies billions of media dollars are suboptimally deployed.

To learn more about Survata’s Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

Amazon Takes 49 Percent of Consumers’ First Product Search, But Search Engines Rebound

Survata Bloomberg Amazon

As covered by Bloomberg, Survata’s Amazon study data powers some of the most important stats in business and brand intel.

Amazon Takes 49 Percent of Consumers’ First Product Search, But Search Engines Rebound
2017 Survata Study Finds 84 Percent in U.S. Expect to Buy Through Amazon This Holiday Season

A new study of 2,000 U.S. consumers by ad and market research firm Survata found that Amazon is still the top spot for consumers’ first product search, yet the company lost some ground to rebounding search engines like Google. Now, 49 percent of consumers turn to Amazon first when shopping for products online, with search engines taking 36 percent and retailers falling farther back at 15 percent. In 2016, a Survata study – previously commissioned by BloomReach – found Amazon at 55 percent, search engines at 28 percent and retailers at 16 percent.

Not only did search engines do better overall this year, but they also did very well – beating Amazon – when searchers were looking to be inspired and didn’t have a specific purchase in mind. Nearly 46 percent will start on search engines when they have no idea of what they want, with Amazon trailing at 39 percent. The remainder, 15 percent of U.S. consumers, said they’d start at a preferred retailer when they weren’t sure what they wanted. Related to specific product categories, electronics, apparel and home furnishings had the highest likelihood for consumers to start on a search engine over Amazon.

The rebound for search engines to 2015 study levels as consumers’ top choice could be attributed to the growing proliferation of mobile devices and traffic, coupled with the improvements in mobile search. Mobile commerce has grown rapidly in the last few years, and online-shopping traffic via mobile this holiday season is expected to account for more than half of retail visits for the first time. Search engines like Google have prioritized mobile search, and a previous study by Google found that search was the primary and most often used mobile-shopping tool.

However, with Amazon still having the advantage on search engines overall and a stranglehold on retailers, Survata also wanted to know why Amazon had that edge. Surprisingly, the study found that price was not the most common main factor consumers started on Amazon.

    -28 percent of consumers credited Amazon’s experience and easy-to-use navigation.
    -27 percent cited Amazon’s product variety and selection as their primary reason for starting there.
    -25 percent named prices as the reason, coming in a startling third place.
    -17 percent said Amazon’s shipping capabilities gave them the edge.

Amazon’s dominance over retailers was even more bleak as it related to holiday shopping. Conducted in the heart of this year’s record-setting holiday-shopping season, Survata’s Amazon study found that 84 percent of U.S. consumers expect to buy a gift on Amazon this year, with nearly half planning to spend at least 50 percent of their holiday budgets through Amazon.

How and where consumers choose to search for products online have significant implications on brand advertising, especially as the competition for advertising dollars between Google and Amazon stays hot. Survata’s Amazon study found that Amazon’s ads were slightly more trusted than Google’s, though not overwhelmingly. Approximately 31 percent of consumers felt that Amazon’s ads were better for finding trusted brands, compared to almost 22 percent for Google. Nearly half, 47 percent, felt that neither was better. A September analysis of 1,000 U.S. consumers by Survata found that 44 percent reported clicking on at least one sponsored product ad on Amazon, versus 46 percent who hadn’t. Approximately 10 percent said they didn’t use Amazon.

ABOUT SURVATA
Survata is a fast-growing technology company that provides brand intelligence to the world’s leading brands and agencies. Clients use Survata’s platform to talk to consumers after every touchpoint, from ad impressions and site visits to purchases and offline behavior. Survata integrates with the leading Data Management Platforms to enable powerful ad research, customer research and market research. The company is headquartered in San Francisco and backed by leading Silicon Valley venture capital investors, including YCombinator, SoftTech VC, PivotNorth Capital, IDG Ventures and Bloomberg Beta. Learn more at www.survata.com

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Survata is Proud to Sponsor the Brand Knew Podcast

Brand Knew is a new bi-monthly podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the initial sponsor – check out their first episode below and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.

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Brand Knew Ep. #1: Discovering Fashion Consumers with Aimee Lapic, former CMO of Banana Republic

In the past five years, online consumer attention has shifted dramatically. In 2012, consumers spent 4.3 hours a day online, with 36% of that on their mobile devices. Today it’s 5.6 hours a day, with 54% on mobile [Source: Mary Meeker Internet Trends] That requires a shift in the marketing strategies of fashion companies, as consumers discover fashion inspiration in new places.

While consumers were changing, so was the competition, with the emergence of subscription model fashion companies such as Stitch Fix and LeTote. These companies try to combat high return rates by predicting what their customers will decide to keep – an approach that may eventually be their undoing.

On this episode of the Brand Knew podcast, Aimée Lapic reveals how she responded to these challenges as CMO of Banana Republic, and provides perspective on the challenges facing the new model fashion companies. Excerpts of Aimée’s interview below:

On the Banana Republic customer:

“I found out that Banana Republic, at the time, did not know who their customer was. They thought that the customer really was looking to Banana for fashion guidance and advice and inspiration. And instead the customer had moved beyond that and was more about expressing themselves through fashion. They were very self-confident people. They did not dress for one occasion versus another – they dress to accentuate their personalities and what they were looking for in a brand such as Banana Republic is a partner in that.”

On the shift from traditional advertising to digital:

“When I inherited the role about 80% of our media was focused on what I call traditional media, print magazines out-of-home advertising, even radio. And quickly I changed that structure to be 90% focused on digital marketing and about 10% focused on still the traditional marketing because that’s where the customer was looking for fashion inspiration. For example, something like 30% of customers at Banana Republic received their inspiration from social media websites.”

On which fashion companies are winning ecommerce:

“I do think there are smaller companies that are willing to take risks in how they go to market and how they meet customer needs that seem to be winning. For example, like a Stitch Fix. According to public information they are close to a billion dollars now in sales which is a super-fast growth rate. I think what makes them win in this ecommerce space is the idea that they’ve taken the risk out of not being able to try on clothes having easy returns for different customers. They’ve put a lot of focus on the data algorithm that allows them to really understand what customers need in terms of fit and styling and types of clothes they like over time.”

On the challenges of a Stitch Fix or LeTote:

“I frankly think the biggest issue for the subscription based businesses over time is retention of customers. The reason the customers are signing up for a Le Tote or a Stitch Fix is because they want to try new things. They want new things in their closet without a lot of risk. Over time, does Stich Fix or LeTote represent new things anymore or does it become part of what their norm is? I think the reason people are attracted to them in terms of innovation may be their undoing over time unless they can continue to keep it really new and different.”

Join us for our next episode where we will be talking to Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft, about the past and future of ride-sharing.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Survata Ad Study Shows Platform Weakness with Young Consumers

As covered by MediaPost and Marketing Dive, Survata recently released a study showing which ad platforms rank highly for trust, relevancy, buying, and discovery by consumers.

Digital advertising is one of the hottest markets across any vertical in the world, and is one of – if not the – best ways that brands large and small connect with consumers. However, at the same time, 2017 has proven that the market also is undergoing significant volatility in the news. From Facebook to YouTube to Google to Twitter, hardly any has been immune, and the others have faced questions about their advertising potential.

Market and Ad Research firm Survata wanted to know where and how consumers put their trust and faith in the major ad platforms. So, Survata had 1,000 consumers – broken out equally among age groups – evaluate the top ad platforms Facebook, Google, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat and Pinterest against each other in arguably the most important measure of “trust” along with four other key advertising categories. The categories included:

    1. Trust: Which platform are consumers most likely to trust?

    2. Experience: Which platform provides the most natural ad experience?

    3. Relevance: Which platform presents the most relevant ads?

    4. Commerce: Which platform are consumers most likely to buy something through an ad?

    5. Discovery: Which platform’s ads help them discover businesses that they wouldn’t otherwise?

Google and Facebook assuredly flexed their muscles in each category, but the study found that the youngest adult buyers gave significantly less favor to both – especially Facebook. Trust was not the social behemoths strong point. Google bested Facebook for most trusted overall by a reasonable margin, but data from the youngest group (18-24) showed that Facebook dropped precipitously in “trust” to its lowest ranking in any category or age group at fourth.

In fact, in every category, the youngest group was around half as likely to select Facebook compared to all other age groups. The drop off even seemed isolated to the this up-and-coming demographic, as it was the only age group that was dramatically different for Facebook compared to the other groups. The next-youngest age group (25-34) generally fell in line with the overall rankings, which signals that Generation Z not only presents a challenge for the duopoly, but also an opportunity for others.

THE FINDINGS
Ages 18-24 vs. Ages 25 and up

TRUST

BEST AD EXPERIENCE

MOST RELEVANT ADS

COMMERCE

DISCOVERY

The full findings were not all bad omens for Facebook and Google, though. Generally, the platforms that usually picked up the slack among the youngest demographic were Instagram and YouTube, subsidiaries of the formers respectively.

Other Insightful Findings:

    1. While relatively new to the ad game, Snapchat saw its best performance among the youngest age group. Its best-performing category by a wide margin was among 18-24-year-olds who named it as the most natural ad experience (14 percent).
    2. As previously noted, the 25-34 age group slightly favored Facebook. Facebook won every single category (even those that Google performed better), except for experience which went to Google.
    4. Instagram’s favor dropped precipitously after age 44.
    5. While it was expected that discovery and commerce were to be most closely linked, and the same for relevancy and trust, it was exactly opposite. The platform most likely to promote buying was surprisingly aligned with most likely to be trusted, and the converse was true for discovering new businesses and relevancy. Best ad experience was the outlier, as it was also the most competitive overall.

To learn more about Survata’s Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

Survata’s “Trends in Ad Measurement” Panel, moderated by The ARF

Survata "Trends In Measurement"

On Thursday, November 2nd, 2017, Survata sponsored “Trends in Ad Measurement”, a candid, information-packed panel discussion moderated by Paul Donato, Chief Research Officer at The Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) on the challenges and opportunities associated with the current state of Ad Measurement. Paul was joined by a panel of industry leaders in Ad Research:

    Dan Elddine – Global Programmatic Lead at Electronic Arts (EA)
    Guli Zhu – Head of Marketing Analytics at Square
    Matthew Karson – Associate Director, Digital Media at The Clorox Company
    Nemr Elsotary – Global Digital Strategy & Activation Lead at Airbnb
    Vadim Tsemekhman – Director of Product Management at WalmartLabs

Survata "Trends in Ad Measurement"

The panel discussed hot-topic issues in the industry including data quality, brand safety, and attribution. Another important topic was programmatic advertising, including the future of it and whether there is a shift to private marketplace or direct. The panel also discussed how marketers are getting ready for new privacy regulations set forth by The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Want to see what other insights were discussed? View the entire panel recording below and check out our photo gallery from the event here.

Hope to see you at our next event!

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To learn about about Survata Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

Survata at Attribution Accelerator with Microsoft

Survata at Attribution Accelerator

How Microsoft Measures Brand Equity in Digital Age

It’s not often that you hear the issue of brand equity discussed at an attribution conference, but in this age of digital advertising, many marketers and advertisers think there is a trade off between focusing on sales and conversion versus building brand equity. Microsoft’s Advertising Effectiveness Innovator Josh Billig sees that the rise of digital advertising and programmatic has often created too much focus on the short term pay off of ad investments, as opposed to the long term.

Digital advertising has made the pendulum swing too far toward only being concerned with driving sales and conversions, which doesn’t account for how digital advertising can be highly impacting on a company’s brand. And, while some question how much brand equity affects company performance these days, there’s little doubt that brand equity supports lifetime value. The trouble is, how do you measure its effect?

At the Attribution Accelerator conference last week, Survata CEO Chris Kelly had the opportunity to co-present with Josh, discussing how a tech-centered approach to Ad Research is essential to measuring the effect that a digital ad campaign has on building brand equity.

As Josh pointed out, if a brand is too closely focused on the short-term effect of digital advertising, then they’ll miss long-term revenue opportunities. But, with all of the rapid changes in the digital ad landscape – from programmatic to the explosion of new market research tools – most of the available market research solutions don’t have the capability to keep pace with technology. Many vendors may come to the table with a solution for measuring programmatic efficacy, but then it can’t measure the efficacy of a machine-learning algorithm that is constantly changing.

That’s why Microsoft turned to Survata, a market and ad research company that distinguishes itself because of its tech DNA. Microsoft requires a campaign measurement partner that can handle scale. For one of its upcoming campaign, Microsoft will serve 5 billion impressions in the U.S. alone across 40 publishers, scale at which a survey-panel or ad-banner approach cannot support.

Survata uses its Publisher Network to unlock premium content for survey-takers, drastically improving quality while also handling the scale Microsoft requires. Microsoft uses Survata for everything from defining its campaign objectives to optimizing campaigns in flight.

For a detailed look at how a brand the size of Microsoft measures its largest campaigns, watch Chris and Josh’s presentation below:

To learn more about our Ad Research solution, please contact us.

Advertising Week: Panel Highlights Ad Measurement in the Mobile Era

Survata at Advertising Week

Last week was America’s big marketing and advertising conference, Advertising Week, and no doubt that a lot of the buzz centered on the continued Russian ad scandal and Google’s YouTube mea culpa.

However, while those crises and respective responses are quite important to advertisers, it was the breakout panels where the significant issues that brands face day in and day out were discussed in detail.

Survata CEO Chris Kelly had to opportunity to participate on the “Measuring Up” panel, a discussion with other industry experts about the challenges of measuring ad and marketing campaign performance at a time when available data and touch points are exploding. As Chris pointed out, the growth of smartphones may indeed contain a wealth of new information to analyze, but it also has made it more difficult to build attribution models. And inherently, the politics behind the companies that offer different data types and slices can muddle the true insights even more.

While advertisers and marketers are facing tremendous pressure to extract and fuse tactical data from the online and offline world, there are some more promising and immediate opportunities. The introduction of new and more innovative uses for location and geospatial data has opened the door for marketers to map the customer journey both in the digital and physical world, as highlighted by Chris’s co-panelist Antonio Tomarchio, CEO of Cuebiq. Antonio even alluded to the opportunities when you combine this data type with survey data.

Here at Survata, we know firsthand about the power of understanding how customers interact with brands both online and in the physical world. As you may have seen, Survata recently announced its Customer Research solution set, which included a partnership with geospatial data firm SafeGraph. Now brands can anonymously identify customers in store, and then survey them later on when they appear on the Survata Publisher Network. This is in addition to our other solutions that get brands firsthand data from digital customers about any brand experience – including advertising campaigns.

Take a look at the video from the Ad Week panel “Measuring Up” below.

Survata at Advertising Week New York 2017

Survata at Advertising Week

Attending Advertising Week this year? Our CEO, Chris Kelly, will discuss with industry leaders new solutions and approaches to measuring the effectiveness of a modern advertising campaign. Come engage in a panel discussion with leaders in audience measurement as they explore both the opportunities and the challenges in today’s data ecosystem.

Moderated by Scott McDonald, President and CEO of The ARF, “Measuring Up” will take place Wednesday, September 27th, at 12:00 PM at the Target Media Network Stage.

Read the full Session Details>>

To learn more about our Ad Research solution, please contact us.