Survata at Adobe Summit 2018

Survata at Adobe Summit

As an Adobe Audience Manager partner, Survata was invited to showcase at the Adobe Summit Conference in Las Vegas. With our integration with Adobe, we offer unprecedented Ad Measurement opportunities for marketers including Audience Validation and Brand Lift studies.

Survata will be right in front of the main Adobe Booth (Booth #957L). Join us as we have a special presentation on how Adobe clients can validate their own audience segments through the Survata platform.

With the rise of programmatic advertising and the growing pains, not all audience segments are created equal. Survata’s Audience Validation product allows brands and agencies to better measure which programmatic segments actually contains their desired audience. As we presented with our client from AKQA, Audience Validation is the future for keeping programmatic quality and accountability.

Planning on attending? Send us a note to connect at Adobe Summit.

Survata at Adobe Summit

Survata Study Uncovers Most Memorable Brand Advertising Slogans

KFC “Finger lickin’ good” edges Kay Jewelers “Every kiss begins with Kay” for top spot

As covered by USA Today, Advertising and Market Research firm Survata today unveiled a top most memorable advertising slogans recognized by consumers. In a study of 3,286 U.S. consumers, KFC’s “Finger lickin’ good” came out on top with an 87.9 percent recognized rate, barely edging out Kay Jewelers highly successful “Every kiss begins with Kay” at 87.4 percent.

The study, which looked at 76 advertising slogans from well-known brands spanning most consumer industries, asked consumers to read a famous slogan, then supply the brand behind the slogan in a “free” response. All identifying brand references – like “Kay” in “Every kiss begins with Kay” – were removed to respect the study’s integrity.

All but one of the slogans found in the top 25 list were recognized by a majority of consumers, and the list included many classics from advertising juggernauts. However,

The Top 50 “Most Memorable Brand Advertising Slogans” are:
“Finger lickin’ good”, KFC — 87.9%
“Every kiss begins with ___”, Kay Jewelers — 87.4%

“15 minutes could save you 15% or more” Geico — 82.32%
“Just do it”, Nike — 82.31%
“Snap, Crackle, Pop”, Rice Krispies — 79.53%
“You’re in good hands”, Allstate — 78.21%
“Taste the rainbow”, Skittles — 75.14%
“Melts in your mouth, not in your hands”, M&Ms –73.19%
“Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s ____”, Maybelline — 69.28%
“I’m lovin’ it”, McDonalds — 68.91%
“____ is on your side”, Nationwide — 68.75%
“They’re G-r-r-reat!” Frosted Flakes — 68.29%
“We have the meats”, Arby’s — 67.77%
“The king of beers”, Budweiser — 66.14%
“M’m! M’m! Good!” Campbell’s — 62.05%
“It gives you wings”, Red Bull — 59.31%
“The happiest place on Earth”, Disney — 58.7%
“The breakfast of champions” Wheaties — 57.14%
“Can you hear me now?”, Verizon — 54.93%
“Taste so good, cats ask for it by name” — 53.85%
“Eat fresh”, Subway — 52.42%
“When it absolutely, positively has to be there overnight”, FedEx — 52.41%
“At the corner of happy and healthy”, Walgreens — 51.54%
“Betcha can’t eat just one”, Lays — 50.75%
“The snack that smiles back” Goldfish — 49.02%
Surprisingly, many brand slogans outside of the top 25 – and thus where a majority of consumers couldn’t identify the brand – were seemingly familiar. Some of the most familiar ones included
What’s in your wallet” — Capital One — 43.14%
“Think outside the bun” — Taco Bell — 33.86%
There are some things money can’t buy. For everything else, there’s …” Mastercard — 45.19%

See the full results below:

Most regonizable Taglines

Survata interviewed 3,286 online respondents, closely equal across age groups and genders. Respondents were reached across the Survata publisher network, where they take a survey to unlock premium content, like articles and ebooks. Respondents received no cash compensation for their participation. More information can be found at

Survata at The ARF’s ConsumerXScience Conference

Survata at ARF

We are happy to return as proud sponsors to The ARF ConsumerXScience conference in New York March 27-28, 2018. This is ARF’s flagship event that focuses on a deep understanding of consumer behavior and drivers of creative excellence. The conference draws leaders from brands, agencies, media, research companies and academia to steer the future of advertising measurement.

Our kiosk will be directly in front of The ARF’s main booth. We will be showcasing our Brand Lift, Audience Verification and Audience Creation products and how we help brands such as Clorox, Microsoft, and Under Armour stay at the forefront of ad research.

Planning on attending? Send us a note to connect at the event.

Survata at ARF

New Dashboard Features: Demographic Data Breakdown, Error Bars & more

Over the past few months here at Survata we have been releasing new features to better support our clients to make the most out of every study ran and gain true insights. We are excited about a number of the features you will start to see in the coming months including advanced variables, and custom reporting.

Get a quick look at your demographic data

Sometimes you need the most basic breakdown of you respondents to best understand and analyze your study. To get a quick look at the breakdown of gender, age and location simply navigate to demographic data in your charts dropdown.

Demographic data

Use error bars to feel more confident in your results

You can now modify your charts to include error bars. Error bars add value by displaying the margin of error to help give you a better idea of how your results compare to the larger population. To take advantage of this new feature, when viewing a chart, select the top right corner – show error bars.


Get more out of your ad effectiveness studies

Clients running ad effectiveness studies can now log in and see their results compared by control and exposed. This allows you to get quicker insight into the pulse of your study without having to take any additional steps. We are continuing to bring product enhancements to our ad effectiveness studies through automated statistical analysis and layering of data sources. To learn more about bringing this type of study to your company take a look at our free eGuide – What is Ad Effectiveness and How Does It Help Your Business?


If you are interested in gaining early access to our newest features add your email address here.

“Trends in Ad Measurement” NYC moderated by Chris Kuist, from The IAB.


After our first successful panel in San Francisco, Survata was happy to host “Trends in Ad Measurement” in New York. Moderated by Chris Kuist, Sr. VP of Research and Impact at the IAB, and joined by a panel of brand leaders in Ad Research:

-Alissa Tofias – Director of Digital Marketing at HBO
-Jonny Silberman – Director of Digital Strategy & Innovation at Anheuser-Busch InBev
-Kristina Kaganer – Director of Global Data Strategy at Coty
-Rudy Grahn – EVP of Business Intelligence at VM One – Zenith

The event took place on Thursday, February 8th, 2017 in Chelsea. The panel discussed trending topics from the industry, including brand safety, attribution, and viewability. On the issue of data quality, “the industry needs to come together” said Jonny Silberman. “We know we have to ask questions, but we don’t know what to ask”, said Kristana Kaganer.

Want to see what other insights were discussed? View the entire panel recording below and check out our photo gallery from the event here.

Hope to see you at our next Survata event!






To learn about about Survata Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

Audience Validation: The Next Step In Programmatic Quality

Survata presented at the Programmatic World Forum in San Francisco on the future of audience data quality. We were joined by our client Ian Kurtz from AKQA on the “Who” question in programmatic advertising. Do the audiences actually contain who data partners say they contain? Marketers are craving more confidence in the data they’re using every day. They want to know their targeting is more effective than a coin toss, especially since advertisers are spending over $1bn in programmatic media.

We touched on Survata’s forward-looking view of Audience Validation and how we’re helping brands and agencies like AKQA tackle the issue of data quality. Imaging interviewing consumers in different programmatic segments and measuring the actual on-target percent. If you are looking for “moms” for your next campaign, you can log into your DMP and select the data provider that has the most accurate audience. This is the next step in programmatic quality.

See our full presentation below:






To learn about about Survata Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

Trends in Ad Measurement NYC – Panel & Happy Hour on 2/8/2018


After our successful event in San Francisco, Survata is bringing “Trends in Ad Measurement” to NYC on Thursday, February 8th, 2018. Enjoy an evening of networking and expert insights complemented by food, drinks, and conversation.

Moderated by Chris Kuist, Sr. VP of Research and Impact at the IAB, and joined by a panel of industry leaders in Ad Research:

-Alissa Tofias – Director of Digital Marketing at HBO
-Jonny Silberman – Director of Digital Strategy & Innovation at Anheuser-Busch InBev
-Kristina Kaganer – Director of Global Data Strategy at Coty

We will discuss ways hot topics in the industry including programmatic, brand safety, attribution, and brand lift.

Thursday, February 2nd, 2018

Registration and networking: 6:00 – 7:00 PM
Panel discussion: 7:00 – 8:00 PM
Continued networking: 8:00 – 9:00 PM

Helen Mills Gallery in Chelsea – 137 W 26th Street, NY NY 10001 (Between 6th and 7th Avenue)

Register Today >>>

We hope to see you there!

The Past and Future of Ride-Sharing w/ Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft


Brand Knew is a new bi-monthly podcast featuring interviews with marketing leaders of major national brands. Hosted by Austin Moorhead, the podcast will dive into how consumers are changing and what brand leaders are doing about it. Survata is proud to be the initial sponsor – check out their second episode below and be sure to subscribe for future episodes with marketing thought leaders.


Brand Knew Ep. #2: The Past and Future of Ride-Sharing w/ Melissa Waters, VP of Marketing at Lyft

In 2017, Lyft expanded coverage in the United States from 54% of the population to 95% of the population. They also added their first international market, Canada. Along the way, the brand was updated. The pink mustaches are gone, but the friendliness is still there. Even with this growth, only 0.4% of miles driven in the US are ride-sharing miles, so there’s still plenty of open road ahead.

Self-driving cars are here. Lyft demonstrated their technology at CES this year. So what happens to the 300,000+ Lyft drivers when the cars can drive themselves?

On this episode of Brand Knew, listen to Melissa Waters, Lyft’s VP of Marketing, discuss how the brand has evolved with the changing ride-sharing market, and what’s going to become of all those those drivers.

Edited excerpts below:

Are you essentially managing two brands at Lyft? One for riders and one for drivers?

Our core brand opportunity is to ensure that we continue to take care of our drivers. What we found is that by taking care of drivers they took care of passengers. So this great flywheel happens: we take care of drivers, they take care of passengers, they provide a great experience, and then passengers say, “Wow, I loved my driver.” Technically we manage two audiences, but really we are one brand. We think about our brand in the intersection of the ride experience: two people getting into a car together.

How do you maintain a unique brand position when your competitors (i.e., Uber) start to emulate you?

I think the best way to do it is to talk about the fact that we’ve been doing it since day one. If we can build awareness of that story, that goes a long way. Our drivers know it. People who are just starting to try us on the passenger side may not know our origin point. They just think of us as “the pink one.” There’s still hurdles to make sure passengers are aware of our origin story, but that feels like a pretty defensible claim. We’ve been here since day one and we’re still operating the same way.

Based on a consumer survey I conducted, about 15% of riders would actually prefer a ride in a self-driving car. How do you manage that looming conflict, between riders who want a driverless car, and drivers who want to keep their jobs?

In a far future vehicle we believe it’s going to be a “car-like object” with multiple people in it, and you can imagine all kinds of situations in which you would need a steward inside that vehicle. You might need to load strollers, assist elderly people or somebody in a wheelchair. A certain amount of road miles will be driven by self-driving vehicles, but others will not be, such as highly dense traffic areas or outside of normal use cases. You’ll need drivers. Then very far afield when the majority of miles are self-driven, there’s still a role for people in vehicles. We think about those vehicles as potentially “the bar car,” “the nail salon on wheels,” all manner of different innovations.

Find Brand Knew Podcast on SoundCloud and iTunes and be sure to subscribe.

Inaccurate Segments May Be Costing Advertisers Billions

Survata AdExchanger
Our CEO Chris Kelly was featured as a guest writer on AdExchanger’s “Data-Driven Thinking” column, calling for more Segment Validation in Programmatic Advertising. Read the full piece below:

Inaccurate Segments May Be Costing Advertisers Billions

We’ve all read the doom-and-gloom news about programmatic problems, from YouTube’s brand safety issues to brand advertisers culling their spending and companies like Chase maintaining performance with drastically reduced ad placements. We’ve seen death prognostications of programmatic as the future of digital marketing, then even the death to the death of programmatic predictions. Dizzying.

The one good thing resulting from the discussion has been the honest reflections on how programmatic can grow up.

However, that’s where it largely stopped, and I can’t help but notice that we only addressed half of the equation. While the industry collectively groaned about the “where” within programmatic advertising – where the ads show up – we haven’t sufficiently reflected on its “who,” as in who is seeing the ads.

Do the audience segments that power programmatic contain who they’re labeled to contain?

It’s a fair question. As New York Times CEO Mark Thompson recently wondered, “When we say a member of the audience is a female fashionista aged 20 to 30, what’s the probability that that’s actually true?”

The reality is that it may be quite low. We’ve been so consumed with brand safety and fixing programmatic spray-and-pray approaches that we haven’t really thought about segment validation. Are we sure a segment of “in-market SUV buyers” contains a larger percentage of buyers than a randomized control group? How can we prove that?

Perhaps this “who” question is programmatic’s next dirty little secret. Data scientists creating segments have many economic incentives to make a segment larger, but few to make it more accurate. And they’re allowed to sell it as a black box. Under these circumstances, we can’t expect consistently accurate audiences.

So, how can we get ahead of this issue before it rises to “crisis” levels, like the brand safety scandals?

The first step is admitting there is a problem. Based on industry chatter, we’re already in the first phases. It’s time to dig in and ask tough questions.

Sanity Check, Please

Sometimes the math behind a segment just isn’t there. I’ve seen a segment that supposedly contained small US business owners that was larger than the Census Bureau’s count of small business owners, multiplied by any reasonable device-per-person ratio. Even if you ignore the impossibility of more than 100% membership rates in a category, is it possible that a model captured 70% of people in a certain category? Sanity-checking audience sizes against a Google search should be a first move, especially when millions of advertising dollars are at stake.

Understand Different Data Types

The “who” within advertising segments is generally determined by three types of data: declared, observed or inferred. Many may know that, but if you’d like a refresher, see here.

Understanding the different types is critical because programmatic segments are made up using one or more of these types. Yet brands often don’t ask their partners which is which. I’ve often seen a brand think a segment it’s getting is observed when it’s actuality inferred. That matters, especially if you don’t know the criteria that determined the inferences.

Check The Source

I’ve heard horror stories about agencies doing a forensic dive into segments to learn people who read about a car crash were put into an “automotive intenders” segment. I’m convinced these are more true than apocryphal. Brands should find out about the precise criteria for being put in certain segments. What trade-offs were made between accuracy and scale? Don’t let it be a black box.

Building audiences is hard. The challenges are significant: Offline data may be available only at the household level, family members may share devices and modeling may be unavoidable in many cases. So, the expectations shouldn’t be that a segment contains only people with a specific attribute, but that it contains significantly more people with that attribute than an untargeted group.

Even acknowledging those difficulties, I can’t help but think of the billions of dollars wasted over the years marketing to incorrectly targeted audiences. Programmatic spend is nearing $33 billion in the US alone this year. It’s hard to know precisely the media dollars powered by third-party data versus first-party data, but even conservatively admitting that 10% to 20% of third-party segments are invalid implies billions of media dollars are suboptimally deployed.

To learn more about Survata’s Ad Research solutions, please contact us.

Amazon Takes 49 Percent of Consumers’ First Product Search, But Search Engines Rebound

Survata Bloomberg Amazon

As covered by Bloomberg, Survata’s Amazon study data powers some of the most important stats in business and brand intel.

Amazon Takes 49 Percent of Consumers’ First Product Search, But Search Engines Rebound
2017 Survata Study Finds 84 Percent in U.S. Expect to Buy Through Amazon This Holiday Season

A new study of 2,000 U.S. consumers by ad and market research firm Survata found that Amazon is still the top spot for consumers’ first product search, yet the company lost some ground to rebounding search engines like Google. Now, 49 percent of consumers turn to Amazon first when shopping for products online, with search engines taking 36 percent and retailers falling farther back at 15 percent. In 2016, a Survata study – previously commissioned by BloomReach – found Amazon at 55 percent, search engines at 28 percent and retailers at 16 percent.

Not only did search engines do better overall this year, but they also did very well – beating Amazon – when searchers were looking to be inspired and didn’t have a specific purchase in mind. Nearly 46 percent will start on search engines when they have no idea of what they want, with Amazon trailing at 39 percent. The remainder, 15 percent of U.S. consumers, said they’d start at a preferred retailer when they weren’t sure what they wanted. Related to specific product categories, electronics, apparel and home furnishings had the highest likelihood for consumers to start on a search engine over Amazon.

The rebound for search engines to 2015 study levels as consumers’ top choice could be attributed to the growing proliferation of mobile devices and traffic, coupled with the improvements in mobile search. Mobile commerce has grown rapidly in the last few years, and online-shopping traffic via mobile this holiday season is expected to account for more than half of retail visits for the first time. Search engines like Google have prioritized mobile search, and a previous study by Google found that search was the primary and most often used mobile-shopping tool.

However, with Amazon still having the advantage on search engines overall and a stranglehold on retailers, Survata also wanted to know why Amazon had that edge. Surprisingly, the study found that price was not the most common main factor consumers started on Amazon.

    -28 percent of consumers credited Amazon’s experience and easy-to-use navigation.
    -27 percent cited Amazon’s product variety and selection as their primary reason for starting there.
    -25 percent named prices as the reason, coming in a startling third place.
    -17 percent said Amazon’s shipping capabilities gave them the edge.

Amazon’s dominance over retailers was even more bleak as it related to holiday shopping. Conducted in the heart of this year’s record-setting holiday-shopping season, Survata’s Amazon study found that 84 percent of U.S. consumers expect to buy a gift on Amazon this year, with nearly half planning to spend at least 50 percent of their holiday budgets through Amazon.

How and where consumers choose to search for products online have significant implications on brand advertising, especially as the competition for advertising dollars between Google and Amazon stays hot. Survata’s Amazon study found that Amazon’s ads were slightly more trusted than Google’s, though not overwhelmingly. Approximately 31 percent of consumers felt that Amazon’s ads were better for finding trusted brands, compared to almost 22 percent for Google. Nearly half, 47 percent, felt that neither was better. A September analysis of 1,000 U.S. consumers by Survata found that 44 percent reported clicking on at least one sponsored product ad on Amazon, versus 46 percent who hadn’t. Approximately 10 percent said they didn’t use Amazon.

Survata is a fast-growing technology company that provides brand intelligence to the world’s leading brands and agencies. Clients use Survata’s platform to talk to consumers after every touchpoint, from ad impressions and site visits to purchases and offline behavior. Survata integrates with the leading Data Management Platforms to enable powerful ad research, customer research and market research. The company is headquartered in San Francisco and backed by leading Silicon Valley venture capital investors, including YCombinator, SoftTech VC, PivotNorth Capital, IDG Ventures and Bloomberg Beta. Learn more at